Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Chronic Exposure to Dim Light at Night or Irregular Lighting Conditions Impact Circadian Behavior, Motor Coordination, and Neuronal Morphology


Delorme, Tara C; Srikanta, Shashank B; Fisk, Angus S; Cloutier, Marie-Ève; Sato, Miho; Pothecary, Carina A; Merz, Chantal; Foster, Russell G; Brown, Steven A; Peirson, Stuart N; Cermakian, Nicolas; Banks, Gareth T (2022). Chronic Exposure to Dim Light at Night or Irregular Lighting Conditions Impact Circadian Behavior, Motor Coordination, and Neuronal Morphology. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 16:855154.

Abstract

Mistimed exposure to light has been demonstrated to negatively affect multiple aspects of physiology and behavior. Here we analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to abnormal lighting conditions in mice. We exposed mice for 1 year to either: a standard light/dark cycle, a "light-pollution" condition in which low levels of light were present in the dark phase of the circadian cycle (dim light at night, DLAN), or altered light cycles in which the length of the weekday and weekend light phase differed by 6 h ("social jetlag"). Mice exhibited several circadian activity phenotypes, as well as changes in motor function, associated particularly with the DLAN condition. Our data suggest that these phenotypes might be due to changes outside the core clock. Dendritic spine changes in other brain regions raise the possibility that these phenotypes are mediated by changes in neuronal coordination outside of the clock. Given the prevalence of artificial light exposure in the modern world, further work is required to establish whether these negative effects are observed in humans as well.

Abstract

Mistimed exposure to light has been demonstrated to negatively affect multiple aspects of physiology and behavior. Here we analyzed the effects of chronic exposure to abnormal lighting conditions in mice. We exposed mice for 1 year to either: a standard light/dark cycle, a "light-pollution" condition in which low levels of light were present in the dark phase of the circadian cycle (dim light at night, DLAN), or altered light cycles in which the length of the weekday and weekend light phase differed by 6 h ("social jetlag"). Mice exhibited several circadian activity phenotypes, as well as changes in motor function, associated particularly with the DLAN condition. Our data suggest that these phenotypes might be due to changes outside the core clock. Dendritic spine changes in other brain regions raise the possibility that these phenotypes are mediated by changes in neuronal coordination outside of the clock. Given the prevalence of artificial light exposure in the modern world, further work is required to establish whether these negative effects are observed in humans as well.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
3 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 17 Feb 2023
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > General Neuroscience
Language:English
Date:13 April 2022
Deposited On:17 Feb 2023 09:55
Last Modified:28 Jun 2024 01:42
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1662-453X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2022.855154
PubMed ID:35495037
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)