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Different assembly mechanisms of leaf epiphytic and endophytic bacterial communities underlie their higher diversity in more diverse forests


Yang, Xian; Wang, Pandeng; Xiao, Bowen; Xu, Qianna; Guo, Qiang; Li, Shao‐peng; Guo, Lulu; Deng, Meifeng; Lu, Jianbo; Liu, Lingli; Ma, Keping; Schmid, Bernhard; Jiang, Lin (2023). Different assembly mechanisms of leaf epiphytic and endophytic bacterial communities underlie their higher diversity in more diverse forests. Journal of Ecology, 111(5):970-981.

Abstract

Plant microbiomes are known to influence host fitness and ecosystem functioning, but mechanisms regulating their structure are poorly understood.
Here, we explored the assembly mechanisms of leaf epiphytic and endophytic bacterial communities using a subtropical forest biodiversity experiment.
Both epiphytic and endophytic bacterial diversity increased as host tree diversity increased. However, the increased epiphytic diversity in more diverse forests was driven by greater epiphytic diversity (i.e. greater α-diversity) on individual trees, whereas the increased endophytic diversity in more diverse forests was driven by greater dissimilarity in endophytic composition (i.e. greater β-diversity) among trees. Mechanistically, responses of epiphytes to changes in host diversity were consistent with mass effects, whereas responses of endophytes were consistent with species sorting.
Synthesis. These results provided novel experimental evidence that biodiversity declines of plant species will lead to biodiversity declines of plant-associated microbiomes, but the underlying mechanism may differ between habitats on the plant host.

Abstract

Plant microbiomes are known to influence host fitness and ecosystem functioning, but mechanisms regulating their structure are poorly understood.
Here, we explored the assembly mechanisms of leaf epiphytic and endophytic bacterial communities using a subtropical forest biodiversity experiment.
Both epiphytic and endophytic bacterial diversity increased as host tree diversity increased. However, the increased epiphytic diversity in more diverse forests was driven by greater epiphytic diversity (i.e. greater α-diversity) on individual trees, whereas the increased endophytic diversity in more diverse forests was driven by greater dissimilarity in endophytic composition (i.e. greater β-diversity) among trees. Mechanistically, responses of epiphytes to changes in host diversity were consistent with mass effects, whereas responses of endophytes were consistent with species sorting.
Synthesis. These results provided novel experimental evidence that biodiversity declines of plant species will lead to biodiversity declines of plant-associated microbiomes, but the underlying mechanism may differ between habitats on the plant host.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Ecology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 May 2023
Deposited On:16 Mar 2023 15:48
Last Modified:29 May 2024 01:50
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0022-0477
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.14084
Project Information:
  • : FunderGeorgia Institute of Technology
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderLanzhou University
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title