Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The short-term effects of activity engagement on working memory performance in older age


Luo, Minxia; Moulder, Robert Glenn; Röcke, Christina (2023). The short-term effects of activity engagement on working memory performance in older age. Psychology and Aging, 38(2):117-131.

Abstract

Does a single bout of activity engagement have short-term effects on cognition in daily life? Using a smartphone-based ambulatory assessment design, this study examined the duration of the effects of three types of activities (i.e., sociocognitive, passive leisure, and physical activities) on working memory performance. For seven times per day (i.e., approximately every 2 hr) over 15 days, 150 healthy older adults (aged 65-91 years) in Switzerland reported their present activities and completed working memory assessments. In an examination of within-person concurrent associations, results from a multilevel model showed that passive leisure activities were negatively associated with working memory. Extending this to time-lagged dynamics, results from multilevel vector autoregression models showed that the negative effect of passive leisure activities and a positive effect of sociocognitive activities on working memory performance appeared 6 hr later and faded out completely by 8 hr later. Follow-up analyses showed that the time-lagged effects of activity engagement were evident among relatively younger individuals with lower levels of formal education. In sum, our findings suggest that a single bout of activity engagement has an impact on cognitive performance as quickly as 6 hr. In line with the "use it or lose it" hypothesis, our findings highlight the importance of continuous and active engagement in sociocognitive activities in older age.

Abstract

Does a single bout of activity engagement have short-term effects on cognition in daily life? Using a smartphone-based ambulatory assessment design, this study examined the duration of the effects of three types of activities (i.e., sociocognitive, passive leisure, and physical activities) on working memory performance. For seven times per day (i.e., approximately every 2 hr) over 15 days, 150 healthy older adults (aged 65-91 years) in Switzerland reported their present activities and completed working memory assessments. In an examination of within-person concurrent associations, results from a multilevel model showed that passive leisure activities were negatively associated with working memory. Extending this to time-lagged dynamics, results from multilevel vector autoregression models showed that the negative effect of passive leisure activities and a positive effect of sociocognitive activities on working memory performance appeared 6 hr later and faded out completely by 8 hr later. Follow-up analyses showed that the time-lagged effects of activity engagement were evident among relatively younger individuals with lower levels of formal education. In sum, our findings suggest that a single bout of activity engagement has an impact on cognitive performance as quickly as 6 hr. In line with the "use it or lose it" hypothesis, our findings highlight the importance of continuous and active engagement in sociocognitive activities in older age.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 28 Mar 2023
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Special Collections > Centers of Competence > Healthy Longevity Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aging, Social Psychology
Language:English
Date:1 March 2023
Deposited On:28 Mar 2023 08:19
Last Modified:30 May 2024 01:40
Publisher:American Psychological Association
ISSN:0882-7974
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1037/pag0000727
PubMed ID:36939604
Project Information:
  • : FunderFP7
  • : Grant ID201917
  • : Project TitlePREDICT - Increasing the PaRticipation of the ElDerly in Clinical Trials
  • : FunderUniversity of Zurich
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title