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Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: origin and recombination


Robinson, Wendy P; Bernasconi, Fabiana; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Ledbetter, David H; Langlois, Sylvie; Malcolm, Sue; Morris, Michael A; Schinzel, Albert (1993). Nondisjunction of chromosome 15: origin and recombination. American Journal of Human Genetics, 53(3):740-51.

Abstract

Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N = 27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N = 5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination are utilized. Standard methods of centromere mapping are employed to determine the level of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, most paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome.

Abstract

Thirty-two cases of uniparental disomy (UPD), ascertained from Prader-Willi syndrome patients (N = 27) and Angelman syndrome patients (N = 5), are used to investigate the pattern of recombination associated with nondisjunction of chromosome 15. In addition, the meiotic stage of nondisjunction is inferred by using markers mapping near the centromere. Two basic approaches to the analysis of recombination are utilized. Standard methods of centromere mapping are employed to determine the level of recombination in specific pairwise intervals along the chromosome. This method shows a significant reduction in recombination for two of five intervals examined. Second, the observed frequency of each recombinant class (i.e., zero, one, two, three, or more observable crossovers) is compared with expected values. This is useful for testing whether the reduction in recombination can be attributed solely to a proportion of cases with no recombination at all (because of asynapsis), with the remaining groups showing normal recombination (or even excess recombination), or whether recombination is uniformly reduced. Analysis of maternal UPD(15) data shows a slight reduction in the multiple-recombinant classes, with a corresponding increase in both the zero- and one-recombinant classes over expected values. The majority, more than 82%, of the extra chromosomes in maternal UPD(15) cases are due to meiotic I nondisjunction events. In contrast, most paternal UPD(15) cases so far examined appear to have a postzygotic origin of the extra paternal chromosome.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Genetics, Genetics (medical), Chromosome 15
Language:English
Date:September 1993
Deposited On:24 Apr 2023 09:07
Last Modified:29 Apr 2024 01:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0002-9297
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
PubMed ID:8352279
Other Identification Number:PMCID: PMC1682425