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Thermal preference of adult mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae) at different altitudes in Switzerland


Hug, David O H; Stegmayer, Raffael I; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Verhulst, Niels O (2023). Thermal preference of adult mosquitoes (Culicidae) and biting midges (Ceratopogonidae) at different altitudes in Switzerland. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 37(3):562-573.

Abstract

Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are among the most important vectors of human and veterinary pathogens. For modelling the distribution of these pathogens, entomological aspects are essential, which in turn are highly dependent on environmental factors, such as temperature. In this study, mosquitoes and biting midges were sampled in multiple microclimates at two low (360, 480 meters above sea level, m.a.s.l.) and two high (1250, 1530 m.a.s.l.) altitude locations in Switzerland. Sets of various traps (CO2 -baited CDC, LED-UV, resting boxes, oviposition cups) equipped with dataloggers were placed in transects at five sites with similar vegetation at each location. Only the CDC and the LED-UV traps collected enough insects for analyses. Taxonomic diversity was greater for mosquitoes but lower for biting midges at lower altitudes. Both mosquitoes and biting midges had a thermal preference. Culicoides preferred the traps with warmer microclimate, especially at lower altitudes, whereas mosquito preferences depended on the species, but not on altitude. Relative humidity had a significant positive impact on catches of biting midges but not mosquitoes. To obtain better data on thermal preferences of resting and ovipositing vectors in addition to host seeking individuals, new and improved collecting methods are needed.

Abstract

Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) and biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) are among the most important vectors of human and veterinary pathogens. For modelling the distribution of these pathogens, entomological aspects are essential, which in turn are highly dependent on environmental factors, such as temperature. In this study, mosquitoes and biting midges were sampled in multiple microclimates at two low (360, 480 meters above sea level, m.a.s.l.) and two high (1250, 1530 m.a.s.l.) altitude locations in Switzerland. Sets of various traps (CO2 -baited CDC, LED-UV, resting boxes, oviposition cups) equipped with dataloggers were placed in transects at five sites with similar vegetation at each location. Only the CDC and the LED-UV traps collected enough insects for analyses. Taxonomic diversity was greater for mosquitoes but lower for biting midges at lower altitudes. Both mosquitoes and biting midges had a thermal preference. Culicoides preferred the traps with warmer microclimate, especially at lower altitudes, whereas mosquito preferences depended on the species, but not on altitude. Relative humidity had a significant positive impact on catches of biting midges but not mosquitoes. To obtain better data on thermal preferences of resting and ovipositing vectors in addition to host seeking individuals, new and improved collecting methods are needed.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Parasitology
Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Health Sciences > General Veterinary
Life Sciences > Insect Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Insect Science, General Veterinary, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, Parasitology
Language:English
Date:1 September 2023
Deposited On:03 May 2023 13:01
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0269-283X
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/mve.12653
PubMed ID:37052330
Project Information:
  • : FunderBundesamt für Lebensmittelsicherheit und Veterinärwesen
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID192524
  • : Project TitleThermal preferences of mosquitoes and biting midges
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)