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Supernumerary marker chromosome (1) of paternal origin and maternal uniparental disomy 1 in a developmentally delayed child


Röthlisberger, Benno; Zerova, Tanja E; Kotzot, Dieter; Buzhievskaya, Tamara I; Balmer, Damina; Schinzel, Albert (2001). Supernumerary marker chromosome (1) of paternal origin and maternal uniparental disomy 1 in a developmentally delayed child. Journal of Medical Genetics, 38(12):885-888.

Abstract

EDITOR—At least 168 cases with a supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) from all chromosomes not including chromosome 15 have been documented.1 Birth prevalence is estimated at 0.14 to 0.72 per 1000.2 Subjects with a SMC have a partial trisomy (duplication) and in some cases a partial tetrasomy (triplication) of the genetic material contained in the SMC. The risk of an abnormal phenotype associated with a randomly ascertained de novo SMC derived from acrocentric autosomes (excluding chromosome 15) is estimated to be approximately 7% compared with approximately 28% for SMCs derived from non-acrocentric autosomes.1 The great variability of clinical findings in patients with SMCs originating from the same chromosome is probably the result of variation in size and genetic content, the degree of mosaicism, and uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosome from which the SMC derived.

Evidence that subjects with SMCs might have an increased risk for UPD of the structurally normal homologues of the SMCs has been reported by several authors. To the best of our knowledge the coexistence of SMCs with UPD has been described for chromosomes 6, 7, 15, 20, and X.3-7 Here, we describe a further patient with multiple congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and the unique finding of coexistence of SMC 1 mosaicism and maternal uniparental disomy 1.

Abstract

EDITOR—At least 168 cases with a supernumerary marker chromosome (SMC) from all chromosomes not including chromosome 15 have been documented.1 Birth prevalence is estimated at 0.14 to 0.72 per 1000.2 Subjects with a SMC have a partial trisomy (duplication) and in some cases a partial tetrasomy (triplication) of the genetic material contained in the SMC. The risk of an abnormal phenotype associated with a randomly ascertained de novo SMC derived from acrocentric autosomes (excluding chromosome 15) is estimated to be approximately 7% compared with approximately 28% for SMCs derived from non-acrocentric autosomes.1 The great variability of clinical findings in patients with SMCs originating from the same chromosome is probably the result of variation in size and genetic content, the degree of mosaicism, and uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosome from which the SMC derived.

Evidence that subjects with SMCs might have an increased risk for UPD of the structurally normal homologues of the SMCs has been reported by several authors. To the best of our knowledge the coexistence of SMCs with UPD has been described for chromosomes 6, 7, 15, 20, and X.3-7 Here, we describe a further patient with multiple congenital anomalies, developmental delay, and the unique finding of coexistence of SMC 1 mosaicism and maternal uniparental disomy 1.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Genetics (clinical), Genetics
Language:English
Date:1 December 2001
Deposited On:28 Jun 2023 06:35
Last Modified:29 Apr 2024 01:38
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0022-2593
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/jmg.38.12.885
Related URLs:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1734780/ (Library Catalogue)
PubMed ID:11768396
Other Identification Number:PMCID: PMC1734780