Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

From growth to silence: expressive endeavours at the end of life


Metzger, Gaudenz Urs (2023). From growth to silence: expressive endeavours at the end of life. Mortality:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

This ethnographic study explores how severely ill and dying per- sons participating in expressive forms of culture, such as art, blog- ging and talking, confront dying and death. Influenced by the increasing relevance of values such as expressivity and creativity and the mediatisation of everyday life, more and more people facing death in globalised Western culture seek their own expres- sive ways to deal with finitude in online and offline contexts. Framed by Tony Walter’s sociology of death, which captures key features of death attitudes within Western societies, this study identifies commonalities in the different expressive endeavours at the end of life. The data for the analysis stem from encounters with 12 persons receiving palliative care in Switzerland. The study found that the performances of individualistic expressivity are informed by the idea of personal growth, prosumer and sharing culture, a quest for belonging and the wish for silence. The findings aim to contribute to further the understanding of current forms of mediated dying in networked society.

Abstract

This ethnographic study explores how severely ill and dying per- sons participating in expressive forms of culture, such as art, blog- ging and talking, confront dying and death. Influenced by the increasing relevance of values such as expressivity and creativity and the mediatisation of everyday life, more and more people facing death in globalised Western culture seek their own expres- sive ways to deal with finitude in online and offline contexts. Framed by Tony Walter’s sociology of death, which captures key features of death attitudes within Western societies, this study identifies commonalities in the different expressive endeavours at the end of life. The data for the analysis stem from encounters with 12 persons receiving palliative care in Switzerland. The study found that the performances of individualistic expressivity are informed by the idea of personal growth, prosumer and sharing culture, a quest for belonging and the wish for silence. The findings aim to contribute to further the understanding of current forms of mediated dying in networked society.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 14 Jul 2023
5 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:01 Faculty of Theology and the Study of Religion > Institute of Religious Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:200 Religion
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Health (social science)
Social Sciences & Humanities > Religious Studies
Social Sciences & Humanities > Philosophy
Uncontrolled Keywords:Art and expression; blogging; digital coping; digital prosumerism; individualism; palliative care; Walter’s ideal types of death
Language:English
Date:2 May 2023
Deposited On:14 Jul 2023 06:21
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1357-6275
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/13576275.2023.2206011
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID188869
  • : Project TitleSterbesettings
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)