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Earth-vertical motion perception assessment using an elevator: a feasibility study


Schellenberg, Simona; Straumann, Dominik; Green, David Andrew; Schuetz, Philipp; Zehnder, Yves; Swanenburg, Jaap (2023). Earth-vertical motion perception assessment using an elevator: a feasibility study. Scientific Reports, 13(1):9450.

Abstract

A feasible, inexpensive, rapid, and easy-to-use method to measure vestibular vertical movement perception is needed to assess the sacculus-mediated low-frequency otolith function of dizzy patients. To evaluate the feasibility of reaction time assessment in response to vertical motion induced by an elevator in healthy young individuals. We recorded linear acceleration/deceleration reaction times (LA-RT/LD-RT) of 20 healthy (13 female) subjects (mean age: 22 years ± 1 SD) as a measure of vertical vestibular motion perception. LA-RT/LD-RT were defined as the time elapsed from the start of elevator acceleration or deceleration to the time at which subjects in a sitting position indicated perceiving a change in velocity by pushing a button with their thumb. The light reaction time was measured as a reference. All 20 subjects tolerated the assessment with repeated elevator rides and reported no adverse events. Over all experiments, one upward and four downward rides had to be excluded for technical reasons (2.5%). The fraction of premature button presses varied among the four conditions, possibly related to elevator vibration (upward rides: LA-RT-up 66%, LD-RT-up 0%; downward rides: LA-RT-down 12%, LD-RT-down 4%). Thus LD-RT-up yielded the most robust results. The reaction time to earth-vertical deceleration elicited by an elevator provides a consistent indicator of linear vestibular motion perception in healthy humans. The testing procedure is inexpensive and easy to use. Deceleration on upward rides yielded the most robust measurements.

Abstract

A feasible, inexpensive, rapid, and easy-to-use method to measure vestibular vertical movement perception is needed to assess the sacculus-mediated low-frequency otolith function of dizzy patients. To evaluate the feasibility of reaction time assessment in response to vertical motion induced by an elevator in healthy young individuals. We recorded linear acceleration/deceleration reaction times (LA-RT/LD-RT) of 20 healthy (13 female) subjects (mean age: 22 years ± 1 SD) as a measure of vertical vestibular motion perception. LA-RT/LD-RT were defined as the time elapsed from the start of elevator acceleration or deceleration to the time at which subjects in a sitting position indicated perceiving a change in velocity by pushing a button with their thumb. The light reaction time was measured as a reference. All 20 subjects tolerated the assessment with repeated elevator rides and reported no adverse events. Over all experiments, one upward and four downward rides had to be excluded for technical reasons (2.5%). The fraction of premature button presses varied among the four conditions, possibly related to elevator vibration (upward rides: LA-RT-up 66%, LD-RT-up 0%; downward rides: LA-RT-down 12%, LD-RT-down 4%). Thus LD-RT-up yielded the most robust results. The reaction time to earth-vertical deceleration elicited by an elevator provides a consistent indicator of linear vestibular motion perception in healthy humans. The testing procedure is inexpensive and easy to use. Deceleration on upward rides yielded the most robust measurements.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:9 June 2023
Deposited On:04 Jul 2023 14:31
Last Modified:29 Mar 2024 04:45
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2045-2322
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-023-36655-7
PubMed ID:37296287
Other Identification Number:PMCID: PMC10256722
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)