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Implications of Below-Ground Allelopathic Interactions of Camelina sativa and Microorganisms for Phosphate Availability and Habitat Maintenance


Hofmann, Diana; Thiele, Björn; Siebers, Meike; Rahmati, Mehdi; Schütz, Vadim; Jeong, Seungwoo; Cui, Jiaxin; Bigler, Laurent; Held, Federico; Wu, Bei; Babic, Nikolina; Kovacic, Filip; Hamacher, Joachim; Hölzl, Georg; Dörmann, Peter; Schulz, Margot (2023). Implications of Below-Ground Allelopathic Interactions of Camelina sativa and Microorganisms for Phosphate Availability and Habitat Maintenance. Plants, 12(15):2815.

Abstract

Toxic breakdown products of young Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz, glucosinolates can eliminate microorganisms in the soil. Since microorganisms are essential for phosphate cycling, only insensitive microorganisms with phosphate-solubilizing activity can improve C. sativa’s phosphate supply. In this study, 33P-labeled phosphate, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and pot experiments unveiled that not only Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas laurentiana used as phosphate-solubilizing inoculants, but also intrinsic soil microorganisms, including Penicillium aurantiogriseum, and the assemblies of root-colonizing microorganisms solubilized as well phosphate from apatite, trigger off competitive behavior between the organisms. Driving factors in the competitiveness are plant and microbial secondary metabolites, while glucosinolates of Camelina and their breakdown products are regarded as key compounds that inhibit the pathogen P. aurantiogriseum, but also seem to impede root colonization of T. viride. On the other hand, fungal diketopiperazine combined with glucosinolates is fatal to Camelina. The results may contribute to explain the contradictory effects of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms when used as biofertilizers. Further studies will elucidate impacts of released secondary metabolites on coexisting microorganisms and plants under different environmental conditions.

Abstract

Toxic breakdown products of young Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz, glucosinolates can eliminate microorganisms in the soil. Since microorganisms are essential for phosphate cycling, only insensitive microorganisms with phosphate-solubilizing activity can improve C. sativa’s phosphate supply. In this study, 33P-labeled phosphate, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and pot experiments unveiled that not only Trichoderma viride and Pseudomonas laurentiana used as phosphate-solubilizing inoculants, but also intrinsic soil microorganisms, including Penicillium aurantiogriseum, and the assemblies of root-colonizing microorganisms solubilized as well phosphate from apatite, trigger off competitive behavior between the organisms. Driving factors in the competitiveness are plant and microbial secondary metabolites, while glucosinolates of Camelina and their breakdown products are regarded as key compounds that inhibit the pathogen P. aurantiogriseum, but also seem to impede root colonization of T. viride. On the other hand, fungal diketopiperazine combined with glucosinolates is fatal to Camelina. The results may contribute to explain the contradictory effects of phosphate-solubilizing microorganisms when used as biofertilizers. Further studies will elucidate impacts of released secondary metabolites on coexisting microorganisms and plants under different environmental conditions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant Science, Ecology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:29 July 2023
Deposited On:10 Aug 2023 10:26
Last Modified:30 May 2024 01:43
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2223-7747
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12152815
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)