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Authenticity in the ethics of human enhancement


Leuenberger, Muriel (2023). Authenticity in the ethics of human enhancement. In: Ienca, Marcello; Jotterand, Fabrice. Routledge handbook on the ethics of human enhancement. London: Taylor & Francis, 133-142.

Abstract

Authenticity has been recognized as a central concept in the ethics of human enhancement. In the last decade, a plethora of novel distinctions, specifications, and definitions of authenticity have been added to the debate. This chapter takes a step back and maps the different accounts of authenticity to provide a nuanced taxonomy of authenticity and reveal the emerging underlying structures of this concept. This chapter identifies three kinds of conditions for authentic creation and change of the true self (coherence, endorsement, and relations) as well as ways how the true self should be expressed (in one's self-conception, self-presentation, and one's body, emotions, and actions). Based on this analysis, this chapter discusses the hopes and concerns human enhancement raises for authenticity. Enhancement technologies do not threaten or foster authenticity across the board but affect different dimensions of authenticity individually. Finally, this chapter turns to the value of authenticity and argues that the debate on authenticity in the ethics of human enhancement would profit from a more extended discussion on the comparative value of the individual dimensions of authenticity.

Abstract

Authenticity has been recognized as a central concept in the ethics of human enhancement. In the last decade, a plethora of novel distinctions, specifications, and definitions of authenticity have been added to the debate. This chapter takes a step back and maps the different accounts of authenticity to provide a nuanced taxonomy of authenticity and reveal the emerging underlying structures of this concept. This chapter identifies three kinds of conditions for authentic creation and change of the true self (coherence, endorsement, and relations) as well as ways how the true self should be expressed (in one's self-conception, self-presentation, and one's body, emotions, and actions). Based on this analysis, this chapter discusses the hopes and concerns human enhancement raises for authenticity. Enhancement technologies do not threaten or foster authenticity across the board but affect different dimensions of authenticity individually. Finally, this chapter turns to the value of authenticity and argues that the debate on authenticity in the ethics of human enhancement would profit from a more extended discussion on the comparative value of the individual dimensions of authenticity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:01 Faculty of Theology and the Study of Religion > Center for Ethics
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Philosophy
Dewey Decimal Classification:100 Philosophy
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > General Arts and Humanities
Uncontrolled Keywords:Enhancement, authenticity, true self
Language:English
Date:1 August 2023
Deposited On:10 Sep 2023 14:56
Last Modified:31 Jan 2024 02:42
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
Series Name:Routledge Handbooks in Applied Ethics
ISBN:9780367615796
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003105596-12