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Cytogenetic and age-dependent risk factors associated with uniparental disomy 15


Robinson, Wendy P; Langlois, S; Schuffenhauer, S; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Michaelis, R C; Christian, S; Ledbetter, D H; Schinzel, Albert (1996). Cytogenetic and age-dependent risk factors associated with uniparental disomy 15. Prenatal Diagnosis, 16(9):837-844.

Abstract

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results primarily from either a paternal deletion of 15q11-q13 or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15. Including the present and published cases, more than 120 patients with maternal UPD of human chromosome 15 have been ascertained. Investigation of chromosome 15 markers indicates that approximately 71 per cent of the additional maternal chromosomes were the result of meiosis I segregation errors, 13 per cent were the result of meiosis II errors, and 16 per cent resulted from post-zygotic duplication of one chromosome 15. An increase in maternal age is associated with UPD cases due to meiotic errors. The age-specific risk for UPD(15) is analysed and shows an exponential increase with maternal age which is similar to that observed for trisomy 21. For women greater than or equal to 40 years of age, the risk for UPD(15) is approximately 1/3400 livebirths. The frequency of chromosome aberrations associated with UPD(15) is also discussed. Two types of aberrations are at significantly increased risk of fetal UPD(15): de novo (or inherited) isochromosome 15 and confined placental mosaicism for trisomy 15. Two additional abnormalities, de novo small marker chromosomes derived from 15, e.g., idic15(pter-q11:q11-pter), and familial Robertsonian translocations involving chromosome 15, appear to have a mildly increased risk of UPD(15).

Abstract

Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) results primarily from either a paternal deletion of 15q11-q13 or maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of chromosome 15. Including the present and published cases, more than 120 patients with maternal UPD of human chromosome 15 have been ascertained. Investigation of chromosome 15 markers indicates that approximately 71 per cent of the additional maternal chromosomes were the result of meiosis I segregation errors, 13 per cent were the result of meiosis II errors, and 16 per cent resulted from post-zygotic duplication of one chromosome 15. An increase in maternal age is associated with UPD cases due to meiotic errors. The age-specific risk for UPD(15) is analysed and shows an exponential increase with maternal age which is similar to that observed for trisomy 21. For women greater than or equal to 40 years of age, the risk for UPD(15) is approximately 1/3400 livebirths. The frequency of chromosome aberrations associated with UPD(15) is also discussed. Two types of aberrations are at significantly increased risk of fetal UPD(15): de novo (or inherited) isochromosome 15 and confined placental mosaicism for trisomy 15. Two additional abnormalities, de novo small marker chromosomes derived from 15, e.g., idic15(pter-q11:q11-pter), and familial Robertsonian translocations involving chromosome 15, appear to have a mildly increased risk of UPD(15).

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Obstetrics and Gynecology
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Genetics (clinical), Obstetrics and Gynecology, Prader-Willi syndrome, uniparental disomy, non-disjunction, t(15ql5q), confined placental mosaicism
Language:English
Date:1 September 1996
Deposited On:27 Sep 2023 16:35
Last Modified:30 Mar 2024 04:43
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0197-3851
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1097-0223(199609)16:9<837::aid-pd956>3.0.co;2-7
PubMed ID:8905898
Other Identification Number:Corpus ID: 21996818