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Integrating Neuromonitoring in Pediatric Emergency Medicine: Exploring Two Options for Point-of-Care Electroencephalogram (pocEEG) via Patient Monitors—A Technical Note


Simma, Leopold; Romano, Fabrizio; Schmidt, Steffen; Ramantani, Georgia; Bölsterli, Bigna K (2023). Integrating Neuromonitoring in Pediatric Emergency Medicine: Exploring Two Options for Point-of-Care Electroencephalogram (pocEEG) via Patient Monitors—A Technical Note. Journal of Personalized Medicine, 13(9):1411.

Abstract

Central nervous system (CNS) disorders are among the most frequent presentations in critically ill children. Status epilepticus (SE) is a frequent scenario in the resuscitation bay. In patients with altered mental status, non-convulsive SE (NCSE) is often underrecognized and critically impacts the neurological outcome and duration of hospitalization. An electroencephalogram (EEG) is required to diagnose NCSE. However, standard EEG recordings are time- and staff-intensive, and their availability is limited, especially outside regular working hours. We aimed to improve patient care by developing a simplified EEG recording method, using a reduced lead montage (point-of-care EEG-pocEEG), that is suitable for use in pediatric emergency departments. The objective was to devise a cost-effective unit with low space requirements that fitted the existing technical infrastructure. We present two technical options for clinical pocEEG acquisition using patient monitors (GE Carescape, Philips IntelliVue) that enable data collection for educational and research purposes. A simplified, rapid response EEG like the pocEEG enables neuromonitoring of patients with CNS disorders in pediatric emergency settings, facilitating timely diagnosis and treatment initiation when standard EEG is not readily available.

Abstract

Central nervous system (CNS) disorders are among the most frequent presentations in critically ill children. Status epilepticus (SE) is a frequent scenario in the resuscitation bay. In patients with altered mental status, non-convulsive SE (NCSE) is often underrecognized and critically impacts the neurological outcome and duration of hospitalization. An electroencephalogram (EEG) is required to diagnose NCSE. However, standard EEG recordings are time- and staff-intensive, and their availability is limited, especially outside regular working hours. We aimed to improve patient care by developing a simplified EEG recording method, using a reduced lead montage (point-of-care EEG-pocEEG), that is suitable for use in pediatric emergency departments. The objective was to devise a cost-effective unit with low space requirements that fitted the existing technical infrastructure. We present two technical options for clinical pocEEG acquisition using patient monitors (GE Carescape, Philips IntelliVue) that enable data collection for educational and research purposes. A simplified, rapid response EEG like the pocEEG enables neuromonitoring of patients with CNS disorders in pediatric emergency settings, facilitating timely diagnosis and treatment initiation when standard EEG is not readily available.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:altered mental status; electroencephalogram; emergency department; non-convulsive status epilepticus; pediatric emergency medicine; point-of-care EEG; rapid response EEG; reduced lead electroencephalogram; simplified electroencephalogram; status epilepticus
Language:English
Date:20 September 2023
Deposited On:05 Oct 2023 17:12
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:39
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2075-4426
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13091411
PubMed ID:37763178
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)