Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Dataveillance imaginaries and their role in chilling effects online


Kappeler, Kiran; Festic, Noemi; Latzer, Michael (2023). Dataveillance imaginaries and their role in chilling effects online. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 179:103120.

Abstract

The automatic tracing and analysis of personal data on the internet is a common occurrence. So far, the extent of internet users’ sense of such dataveillance and reactions to it remain obscure. This article explores 1) internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries and 2) the role they play for self-inhibited digital communication behaviors in relation to other behavioral responses to a sense of dataveillance. To address these questions, we apply thematic analysis to semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries affect their self-inhibition: Not trusting actors, being aware of advanced workings of dataveillance, being critical of data collecting and monetizing, valuing privacy highly, and evaluating consequences of dataveillance negatively lead to self-inhibition. Such self-inhibition because of a sense of dataveillance, i.e., chilling effects of dataveillance, manifest in not using certain services, not searching for information, and not voicing one's opinion, which is problematic in a democracy. Further behavioral responses to a sense of dataveillance include not changing one's use of services and using privacy enhancing techniques. By shedding light on the role internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries play for their self-inhibition of legitimate digital communication behavior, this article innovatively contributes to the empirical investigation of the chilling effects of dataveillance.

Abstract

The automatic tracing and analysis of personal data on the internet is a common occurrence. So far, the extent of internet users’ sense of such dataveillance and reactions to it remain obscure. This article explores 1) internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries and 2) the role they play for self-inhibited digital communication behaviors in relation to other behavioral responses to a sense of dataveillance. To address these questions, we apply thematic analysis to semi-structured interviews. Our findings show that internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries affect their self-inhibition: Not trusting actors, being aware of advanced workings of dataveillance, being critical of data collecting and monetizing, valuing privacy highly, and evaluating consequences of dataveillance negatively lead to self-inhibition. Such self-inhibition because of a sense of dataveillance, i.e., chilling effects of dataveillance, manifest in not using certain services, not searching for information, and not voicing one's opinion, which is problematic in a democracy. Further behavioral responses to a sense of dataveillance include not changing one's use of services and using privacy enhancing techniques. By shedding light on the role internet users’ dataveillance imaginaries play for their self-inhibition of legitimate digital communication behavior, this article innovatively contributes to the empirical investigation of the chilling effects of dataveillance.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

12 downloads since deposited on 17 Oct 2023
12 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:070 News media, journalism & publishing
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Human Factors and Ergonomics
Physical Sciences > Software
Social Sciences & Humanities > Education
Physical Sciences > General Engineering
Physical Sciences > Human-Computer Interaction
Physical Sciences > Hardware and Architecture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Dataveillance, Digital communication, Self-inhibition, Chilling effects, Behavioral responses, Imaginaries
Language:English
Date:1 November 2023
Deposited On:17 Oct 2023 15:51
Last Modified:29 Feb 2024 02:50
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1071-5819
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhcs.2023.103120
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID201176
  • : Project TitleThe chilling effects of dataveillance: Conceptual advances and empirical evidence for Switzerland
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)