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The delivery of genetic counseling services in Europe


Passarge, E; Vogel, F (1980). The delivery of genetic counseling services in Europe. Human Genetics, 56(1):1-5.

Abstract

Organizational forms and the current status of genetic counseling within the health care system of 15 European countries were evaluated by questionnaire and at a symposium, with individuals present from Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union. In spite of wide differences between these countries, certain similarities with respect to the delivery of genetic counseling services could be observed:
(i) most genetic counseling is done within university institutions or closely linked to it;
(ii) governmental support of genetic counseling is developing slowly, and genetic counseling is usually not yet fully integrated into the health care system;
(iii) there is lack of qualified personnel;
(iv) no guide lines for formal education have been developed, but a postgraduate training period of no less than four years is considered a minimum;
(v) without appropriate support, genetic counseling is a burden for research in human genetics; yet, a strict separation of genetic counseling and research activities is not recommended;
(vi) on the average, a team providing genetic counseling for about 1-2 million people should consist of 3-4 physicians, 5-10 technicians, 2-3 secretaries, and other supportive personnel.

Abstract

Organizational forms and the current status of genetic counseling within the health care system of 15 European countries were evaluated by questionnaire and at a symposium, with individuals present from Austria, Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Soviet Union. In spite of wide differences between these countries, certain similarities with respect to the delivery of genetic counseling services could be observed:
(i) most genetic counseling is done within university institutions or closely linked to it;
(ii) governmental support of genetic counseling is developing slowly, and genetic counseling is usually not yet fully integrated into the health care system;
(iii) there is lack of qualified personnel;
(iv) no guide lines for formal education have been developed, but a postgraduate training period of no less than four years is considered a minimum;
(v) without appropriate support, genetic counseling is a burden for research in human genetics; yet, a strict separation of genetic counseling and research activities is not recommended;
(vi) on the average, a team providing genetic counseling for about 1-2 million people should consist of 3-4 physicians, 5-10 technicians, 2-3 secretaries, and other supportive personnel.

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Contributors:Berg, K, Bochkov, N P, Czeizel, A, Emerit, I, Fraccaro, M, Harper, P S, ten Kate, L P, Leroy, J G, Mikkelsen, M, Norio, R, Rosenkranz, W, Schmid, Werner (UZH), Seemanová, E, Witkowski, R
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Genetics
Health Sciences > Genetics (clinical)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Genetics (clinical), Genetics, Health Care, Internal Medicine, European Country, Metabolic Disease, Health Care System
Language:English
Date:1 October 1980
Deposited On:25 Oct 2023 15:16
Last Modified:30 Mar 2024 04:48
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-6717
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/bf00281565
PubMed ID:7203476
Other Identification Number:Corpus ID: 19073569