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Common laboratory tests and their correlation with the clinical presentation and prognosis of lemierre syndrome


Fumagalli, Riccardo M; Gloor, Elvira; Kaufmann, Philippe A; Frehner, Maurus; Voci, Davide; Konstantinides, Stavros V; Kucher, Nils; Nicoletti, Tommaso F; Pecci, Alessandro; Valerio, Luca; Barco, Stefano (2023). Common laboratory tests and their correlation with the clinical presentation and prognosis of lemierre syndrome. Anaerobe, 83:102773.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Lemierre syndrome is a thromboembolic complication following an acute bacterial infection of the head/neck area, often due to anaerobes. Data on the prognostic role of laboratory parameters is lacking.

METHODS

We analyzed individual-patient level data from a multinational cohort of patients with Lemierre-syndrome. Patients had an infection in the head/neck area, and contiguous vein thrombosis or septic embolism, irrespective of the causal pathogen. We studied the patterns of white blood cell count, platelet count, and C-reactive protein concentration investigating their association with baseline characteristics and in-hospital clinical outcomes (septic embolism, major bleeding, all-cause death).

RESULTS

A total of 447 (63%) patients had complete data for analysis. White blood cells were elevated across all subgroups (median 17 × 10$^{3}$/μL; Q1-Q3:12-21). Median platelet count was 61 × 10$^{3}$/μL (Q1-Q3:30-108) with decreasing levels with increasing age. Males, patients with renal failure or cardiopulmonary impairment, and those with typical Lemierre syndrome (tonsillitis, septic thromboembolism, positivity for Fusobacterium spp.) had the lowest platelet count. Median C-reactive protein was 122 (Q1-Q3:27-248) mg/L with higher values in patients who also had more severe thrombocytopenia. The overall risk of complications was similar across subgroups of patients stratified according to white blood cell and C-reactive protein levels. Patients in the lowest third of platelet count (<42 × 10$^{3}$/μL) had the highest rate of complications (26%), as opposed to those in the highest third (11%), notably septic embolic events.

CONCLUSIONS

Common laboratory tests correlate with the clinical presentation of Lemierre syndrome. However, extreme values did not appear to be prognostically relevant for in-hospital complications and potentially able to improve clinical management.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Lemierre syndrome is a thromboembolic complication following an acute bacterial infection of the head/neck area, often due to anaerobes. Data on the prognostic role of laboratory parameters is lacking.

METHODS

We analyzed individual-patient level data from a multinational cohort of patients with Lemierre-syndrome. Patients had an infection in the head/neck area, and contiguous vein thrombosis or septic embolism, irrespective of the causal pathogen. We studied the patterns of white blood cell count, platelet count, and C-reactive protein concentration investigating their association with baseline characteristics and in-hospital clinical outcomes (septic embolism, major bleeding, all-cause death).

RESULTS

A total of 447 (63%) patients had complete data for analysis. White blood cells were elevated across all subgroups (median 17 × 10$^{3}$/μL; Q1-Q3:12-21). Median platelet count was 61 × 10$^{3}$/μL (Q1-Q3:30-108) with decreasing levels with increasing age. Males, patients with renal failure or cardiopulmonary impairment, and those with typical Lemierre syndrome (tonsillitis, septic thromboembolism, positivity for Fusobacterium spp.) had the lowest platelet count. Median C-reactive protein was 122 (Q1-Q3:27-248) mg/L with higher values in patients who also had more severe thrombocytopenia. The overall risk of complications was similar across subgroups of patients stratified according to white blood cell and C-reactive protein levels. Patients in the lowest third of platelet count (<42 × 10$^{3}$/μL) had the highest rate of complications (26%), as opposed to those in the highest third (11%), notably septic embolic events.

CONCLUSIONS

Common laboratory tests correlate with the clinical presentation of Lemierre syndrome. However, extreme values did not appear to be prognostically relevant for in-hospital complications and potentially able to improve clinical management.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Angiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:1 October 2023
Deposited On:03 Nov 2023 11:04
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:39
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1075-9964
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anaerobe.2023.102773
PubMed ID:37595866
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)