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Antimicrobial resistance among farming communities in Wakiso District, Central Uganda: A knowledge, awareness and practice study


Muleme, James; Ssempebwa, John C; Musoke, David; Kankya, Clovice; Wafula, Solomon Tsebeni; Okello, Justine; Ninsiima, Lesley Rose; Wambi, Rogers; Baguma, James Natweta; Lubega, Grace; Wagaba, Brenda; Hartnack, Sonja (2023). Antimicrobial resistance among farming communities in Wakiso District, Central Uganda: A knowledge, awareness and practice study. PLoS ONE, 18(6):e0284822.

Abstract

Background
Antibiotics are increasingly becoming ineffective as antimicrobial resistance (AMR) continues to develop and spread globally—leading to more difficult to treat infections. Countries such as Uganda are still challenged with implementation of AMR related strategies due to data paucity. This includes a lack of data on the prevailing knowledge and awareness of antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic use among farming communities, both commercial and subsistence, which are instrumental in the implementation of targeted interventions. The aim of our study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices on AMR among subsistence and commercial farmers in Wakiso district, central Uganda.


Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire in Wakiso district, Central Uganda in between June and September 2021. Polytomous latent class analyses were performed to group participants based on their responses. Multivariable regression and conditional inference trees were used to determine the association between demographic factors and knowledge on antibiotics and AMR.


Results
A total of 652 respondents participated in the study among whom 84% were able to correctly describe what antibiotics are. Subsistence farmers (OR = 6.89, 95% CI [3.20; 14.83]), and to a lesser extent, farming community members which obtained their main income by another business (OR = 2.25, 95% CI [1.345; 3.75]) were more likely to be able to describe antibiotics correctly than individuals involved in commercial farming. Based on the latent class analysis, three latent classes indicating different levels of knowledge on AMR, were found. Subsistence farming, higher educational level and younger age were found to be associated with belonging to a class of better knowledge.


Conclusion
The majority of participants were able to correctly describe antibiotics and aware of AMR, however there was some degree of misunderstanding of several AMR concepts. Targeted AMR interventions should improve awareness and also ensure that not only subsistence farmers, but commercial farmers, are included.

Abstract

Background
Antibiotics are increasingly becoming ineffective as antimicrobial resistance (AMR) continues to develop and spread globally—leading to more difficult to treat infections. Countries such as Uganda are still challenged with implementation of AMR related strategies due to data paucity. This includes a lack of data on the prevailing knowledge and awareness of antimicrobial resistance and antibiotic use among farming communities, both commercial and subsistence, which are instrumental in the implementation of targeted interventions. The aim of our study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices on AMR among subsistence and commercial farmers in Wakiso district, central Uganda.


Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted using a semi-structured questionnaire in Wakiso district, Central Uganda in between June and September 2021. Polytomous latent class analyses were performed to group participants based on their responses. Multivariable regression and conditional inference trees were used to determine the association between demographic factors and knowledge on antibiotics and AMR.


Results
A total of 652 respondents participated in the study among whom 84% were able to correctly describe what antibiotics are. Subsistence farmers (OR = 6.89, 95% CI [3.20; 14.83]), and to a lesser extent, farming community members which obtained their main income by another business (OR = 2.25, 95% CI [1.345; 3.75]) were more likely to be able to describe antibiotics correctly than individuals involved in commercial farming. Based on the latent class analysis, three latent classes indicating different levels of knowledge on AMR, were found. Subsistence farming, higher educational level and younger age were found to be associated with belonging to a class of better knowledge.


Conclusion
The majority of participants were able to correctly describe antibiotics and aware of AMR, however there was some degree of misunderstanding of several AMR concepts. Targeted AMR interventions should improve awareness and also ensure that not only subsistence farmers, but commercial farmers, are included.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Chair in Veterinary Epidemiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Multidisciplinary
Uncontrolled Keywords:Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:2 June 2023
Deposited On:23 Nov 2023 12:57
Last Modified:19 Apr 2024 11:13
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0284822
PubMed ID:37267231
Other Identification Number:PMCID: PMC10237438
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)