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The Effects of Alcohol-Related Social Media Content on Adolescents’ Momentary Perceived Norms, Attitudes, and Drinking Intentions


Vanherle, Robyn; Geber, Sarah; Beullens, Kathleen (2023). The Effects of Alcohol-Related Social Media Content on Adolescents’ Momentary Perceived Norms, Attitudes, and Drinking Intentions. Health Communication:1-19.

Abstract

Research has shown that exposure to alcohol posts on social media can shape adolescents’ alcohol-related normative perceptions and attitudes, which in turn play a role in their drinking intentions. However, these studies focused on content in general, neglecting the variety of alcohol posts on social media. Furthermore, they were mostly cross-sectional and studied behaviors at one-time point, thus not considering within-person/daily (co-)fluctuations in exposure to alcohol posts and drinking cognitions. Therefore, this daily diary study among 275 Belgian adolescents (Mage = 15.83, SD = .88, 56.2% girls, 43% boys, 1 X) adds to the literature by examining how two types of alcohol posts (i.e. alcohol-focused vs. friend-focused) differently predict adolescents’ normative perceptions (i.e. descriptive and injunctive), alcohol-related attitudes and intentions to drink, both on the between- and daily within-levels. The results showed that alcohol-focused posts but not friend-focused posts predicted adolescents’ drinking cognitions (i.e. injunctive norms, descriptive norms, and attitudes) on the daily within-level. Descriptive norms and attitudes also predicted the intention to drink, on the between and daily within-level for attitudes but only on the daily within-level for norms. Overall, the results highlight that specific types of alcohol posts differently shape adolescents’ daily drinking cognitions, thereby informing future interventions.

Abstract

Research has shown that exposure to alcohol posts on social media can shape adolescents’ alcohol-related normative perceptions and attitudes, which in turn play a role in their drinking intentions. However, these studies focused on content in general, neglecting the variety of alcohol posts on social media. Furthermore, they were mostly cross-sectional and studied behaviors at one-time point, thus not considering within-person/daily (co-)fluctuations in exposure to alcohol posts and drinking cognitions. Therefore, this daily diary study among 275 Belgian adolescents (Mage = 15.83, SD = .88, 56.2% girls, 43% boys, 1 X) adds to the literature by examining how two types of alcohol posts (i.e. alcohol-focused vs. friend-focused) differently predict adolescents’ normative perceptions (i.e. descriptive and injunctive), alcohol-related attitudes and intentions to drink, both on the between- and daily within-levels. The results showed that alcohol-focused posts but not friend-focused posts predicted adolescents’ drinking cognitions (i.e. injunctive norms, descriptive norms, and attitudes) on the daily within-level. Descriptive norms and attitudes also predicted the intention to drink, on the between and daily within-level for attitudes but only on the daily within-level for norms. Overall, the results highlight that specific types of alcohol posts differently shape adolescents’ daily drinking cognitions, thereby informing future interventions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Department of Communication and Media Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:070 News media, journalism & publishing
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Health (social science)
Social Sciences & Humanities > Communication
Language:English
Date:24 September 2023
Deposited On:20 Nov 2023 16:25
Last Modified:31 Jan 2024 02:44
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:1041-0236
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2023.2259696
Project Information:
  • : FunderInterne Fondsen KU Leuven
  • : Grant ID3H190365
  • : Project Title