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Total meat (flesh) supply may be a significant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases worldwide


You, Wenpeng; Feng, Shuhuan; Donnelly, Frank (2023). Total meat (flesh) supply may be a significant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases worldwide. Food Science & Nutrition, 11(6):3203-3212.

Abstract

Consumption of red meat instead of white meat has typically been associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Reflecting actual diet patterns, this study explored the role of total meat (red + white) in predicting CVD incidence. Data from 217 countries were extracted from United Nations agencies for the analyses in five steps. Bivariate correlations were applied to examine the relationship between total meat and CVD incidence globally and regionally. Partial correlation was applied to identify that total meat was an independent predictor of CVD incidence while socioeconomic status, obesity, and urbanization were statistically constant. Stepwise linear regression was conducted for selecting the significant predictor of CVD incidence. SPSS 28 and Microsoft Excel were used for correlation analyses. Globally, total meat correlated to CVD incidence strongly and significantly in bivariate correlation models. This relationship remained significant in partial correlation when socioeconomic status, obesity, and urbanization were statistically kept constant. Stepwise multiple regression identified that, second to socioeconomic status, total meat was a significant predictor of CVD incidence. Total meat correlated to CVD incidence in different country groupings. However, the correlations between total meat and CVD incidence were significantly stronger in developing countries than in developed countries. Worldwide, total meat (flesh) consumption correlated to CVD incidence independently, but significantly stronger in developing countries than in developed countries. This correlation is worth exploring further in longitudinal cohort studies.

Abstract

Consumption of red meat instead of white meat has typically been associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Reflecting actual diet patterns, this study explored the role of total meat (red + white) in predicting CVD incidence. Data from 217 countries were extracted from United Nations agencies for the analyses in five steps. Bivariate correlations were applied to examine the relationship between total meat and CVD incidence globally and regionally. Partial correlation was applied to identify that total meat was an independent predictor of CVD incidence while socioeconomic status, obesity, and urbanization were statistically constant. Stepwise linear regression was conducted for selecting the significant predictor of CVD incidence. SPSS 28 and Microsoft Excel were used for correlation analyses. Globally, total meat correlated to CVD incidence strongly and significantly in bivariate correlation models. This relationship remained significant in partial correlation when socioeconomic status, obesity, and urbanization were statistically kept constant. Stepwise multiple regression identified that, second to socioeconomic status, total meat was a significant predictor of CVD incidence. Total meat correlated to CVD incidence in different country groupings. However, the correlations between total meat and CVD incidence were significantly stronger in developing countries than in developed countries. Worldwide, total meat (flesh) consumption correlated to CVD incidence independently, but significantly stronger in developing countries than in developed countries. This correlation is worth exploring further in longitudinal cohort studies.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Food Science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Food Science
Language:English
Date:1 June 2023
Deposited On:22 Nov 2023 15:50
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:40
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:2048-7177
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/fsn3.3300
PubMed ID:37324898
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)