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Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiotic Paraburkholderia Species: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives


Bellés-Sancho, Paula; Beukes, Chrizelle; James, Euan K; Pessi, Gabriella (2023). Nitrogen-Fixing Symbiotic Paraburkholderia Species: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives. Nitrogen, 4(1):135-158.

Abstract

A century after the discovery of rhizobia, the first Beta-proteobacteria species (beta-rhizobia) were isolated from legume nodules in South Africa and South America. Since then, numerous species belonging to the Burkholderiaceae family have been isolated. The presence of a highly branching lineage of nodulation genes in beta-rhizobia suggests a long symbiotic history. In this review, we focus on the beta-rhizobial genus Paraburkholderia, which includes two main groups: the South American mimosoid-nodulating Paraburkholderia and the South African predominantly papilionoid-nodulating Paraburkholderia. Here, we discuss the latest knowledge on Paraburkholderia nitrogen-fixing symbionts in each step of the symbiosis, from their survival in the soil, through the first contact with the legumes until the formation of an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in root nodules. Special attention is given to the strain P. phymatum STM815T that exhibits extraordinary features, such as the ability to: (i) enter into symbiosis with more than 50 legume species, including the agriculturally important common bean, (ii) outcompete other rhizobial species for nodulation of several legumes, and (iii) endure stressful soil conditions (e.g., high salt concentration and low pH) and high temperatures.

Abstract

A century after the discovery of rhizobia, the first Beta-proteobacteria species (beta-rhizobia) were isolated from legume nodules in South Africa and South America. Since then, numerous species belonging to the Burkholderiaceae family have been isolated. The presence of a highly branching lineage of nodulation genes in beta-rhizobia suggests a long symbiotic history. In this review, we focus on the beta-rhizobial genus Paraburkholderia, which includes two main groups: the South American mimosoid-nodulating Paraburkholderia and the South African predominantly papilionoid-nodulating Paraburkholderia. Here, we discuss the latest knowledge on Paraburkholderia nitrogen-fixing symbionts in each step of the symbiosis, from their survival in the soil, through the first contact with the legumes until the formation of an efficient nitrogen-fixing symbiosis in root nodules. Special attention is given to the strain P. phymatum STM815T that exhibits extraordinary features, such as the ability to: (i) enter into symbiosis with more than 50 legume species, including the agriculturally important common bean, (ii) outcompete other rhizobial species for nodulation of several legumes, and (iii) endure stressful soil conditions (e.g., high salt concentration and low pH) and high temperatures.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Engineering
Language:English
Date:8 March 2023
Deposited On:27 Nov 2023 09:09
Last Modified:29 Feb 2024 02:53
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2504-3129
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/nitrogen4010010
Project Information:
  • : FunderBill and Melinda Gates Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderForeign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO), UK
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)