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The effect of longitudinal sleep monitoring on clinician agreement in obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis: The ELSA study


Roeder, Maurice; Sievi, Noriane A; Frei, Nina; Schwarz, Esther I; Steinack, Carolin; Gaisl, Thomas; Kohler, Malcolm (2024). The effect of longitudinal sleep monitoring on clinician agreement in obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis: The ELSA study. Journal of Sleep Research, 33(2):e13943.

Abstract

There is strong evidence for clinically relevant night‐to‐night variability of respiratory events in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep experts retrospectively evaluated diagnostic data in 56 patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Experts were blinded to the fact that they were diagnosing the same case twice, once based on a short report of a single in‐laboratory respiratory polygraphy and once with the additional information of 14 nights of pulse oximetry at home. All experts (n = 22) were highly qualified, 13 experts (59.1%) treated > 100 patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea per year. In 12 patients, the apnea–hypopnea index in the respiratory polygraphy was < 5 per hr, but the mean oxygen desaturation index of 14 nights of pulse oximetry was ≥ 5 per hr. The additional information of 14 nights of pulse oximetry helped to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea with a 70% consensus in two of those patients (16.7% [95% confidence interval: 4.7/44.8]). In eight patients, experts could not agree to a 70% consensus regarding continuous positive airway pressure therapy recommendation after respiratory polygraphy. The additional information of multiple‐night testing led to a consensus in three of those cases (37.5% [95% confidence interval: 14/69]). Change of obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and continuous positive airway pressure recommendation was significantly negatively associated with the number of treated obstructive sleep apnea patients > 100 per year compared with 0–29 patients per year (Coef. [95% confidence interval] −0.63 [−1.22/−0.04] and −0.61 [−1.07/−0.15], respectively). Experts found already a high level of consensus regarding obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis, severity and continuous positive airway pressure recommendation after a single respiratory polygraphy. However, longitudinal sleep monitoring could help increase consensus in selected patients with diagnostic uncertainty.

Abstract

There is strong evidence for clinically relevant night‐to‐night variability of respiratory events in patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep experts retrospectively evaluated diagnostic data in 56 patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea. Experts were blinded to the fact that they were diagnosing the same case twice, once based on a short report of a single in‐laboratory respiratory polygraphy and once with the additional information of 14 nights of pulse oximetry at home. All experts (n = 22) were highly qualified, 13 experts (59.1%) treated > 100 patients with suspected obstructive sleep apnea per year. In 12 patients, the apnea–hypopnea index in the respiratory polygraphy was < 5 per hr, but the mean oxygen desaturation index of 14 nights of pulse oximetry was ≥ 5 per hr. The additional information of 14 nights of pulse oximetry helped to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea with a 70% consensus in two of those patients (16.7% [95% confidence interval: 4.7/44.8]). In eight patients, experts could not agree to a 70% consensus regarding continuous positive airway pressure therapy recommendation after respiratory polygraphy. The additional information of multiple‐night testing led to a consensus in three of those cases (37.5% [95% confidence interval: 14/69]). Change of obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and continuous positive airway pressure recommendation was significantly negatively associated with the number of treated obstructive sleep apnea patients > 100 per year compared with 0–29 patients per year (Coef. [95% confidence interval] −0.63 [−1.22/−0.04] and −0.61 [−1.07/−0.15], respectively). Experts found already a high level of consensus regarding obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis, severity and continuous positive airway pressure recommendation after a single respiratory polygraphy. However, longitudinal sleep monitoring could help increase consensus in selected patients with diagnostic uncertainty.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Behavioral Neuroscience, Cognitive Neuroscience, General Medicine
Language:English
Date:April 2024
Deposited On:01 Dec 2023 09:14
Last Modified:29 Apr 2024 01:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0962-1105
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.13943
PubMed ID:37197997
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)