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Dominance in self-compatibility between subgenomes of allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica shown by transgenic restoration of self-incompatibility


Yew, Chow-Lih; Tsuchimatsu, Takashi; Shimizu-Inatsugi, Rie; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Hatakeyama, Masaomi; Kakui, Hiroyuki; Ohta, Takuma; Suwabe, Keita; Watanabe, Masao; Takayama, Seiji; Shimizu, Kentaro K (2023). Dominance in self-compatibility between subgenomes of allopolyploid Arabidopsis kamchatica shown by transgenic restoration of self-incompatibility. Nature Communications, 14(1):7618.

Abstract

The evolutionary transition to self-compatibility facilitates polyploid speciation. In Arabidopsis relatives, the self-incompatibility system is characterized by epigenetic dominance modifiers, among which small RNAs suppress the expression of a recessive SCR/SP11 haplogroup. Although the contribution of dominance to polyploid self-compatibility is speculated, little functional evidence has been reported. Here we employ transgenic techniques to the allotetraploid plant A. kamchatica. We find that when the dominant SCR-B is repaired by removing a transposable element insertion, self-incompatibility is restored. This suggests that SCR was responsible for the evolution of self-compatibility. By contrast, the reconstruction of recessive SCR-D cannot restore self-incompatibility. These data indicate that the insertion in SCR-B conferred dominant self-compatibility to A. kamchatica. Dominant self-compatibility supports the prediction that dominant mutations increasing selfing rate can pass through Haldane’s sieve against recessive mutations. The dominance regulation between subgenomes inherited from progenitors contrasts with previous studies on novel epigenetic mutations at polyploidization termed genome shock.

Abstract

The evolutionary transition to self-compatibility facilitates polyploid speciation. In Arabidopsis relatives, the self-incompatibility system is characterized by epigenetic dominance modifiers, among which small RNAs suppress the expression of a recessive SCR/SP11 haplogroup. Although the contribution of dominance to polyploid self-compatibility is speculated, little functional evidence has been reported. Here we employ transgenic techniques to the allotetraploid plant A. kamchatica. We find that when the dominant SCR-B is repaired by removing a transposable element insertion, self-incompatibility is restored. This suggests that SCR was responsible for the evolution of self-compatibility. By contrast, the reconstruction of recessive SCR-D cannot restore self-incompatibility. These data indicate that the insertion in SCR-B conferred dominant self-compatibility to A. kamchatica. Dominant self-compatibility supports the prediction that dominant mutations increasing selfing rate can pass through Haldane’s sieve against recessive mutations. The dominance regulation between subgenomes inherited from progenitors contrasts with previous studies on novel epigenetic mutations at polyploidization termed genome shock.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Functional Genomics Center Zurich
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
08 Research Priority Programs > Evolution in Action: From Genomes to Ecosystems
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > General Chemistry
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Physical Sciences > General Physics and Astronomy
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Physics and Astronomy, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
Language:English
Date:29 November 2023
Deposited On:20 Dec 2023 10:58
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:40
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2041-1723
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-023-43275-2
PubMed ID:38030610
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)