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Tapping lipid droplets: A rich fat diet of intracellular bacterial pathogens


Hüsler, Dario; Stauffer, Pia; Hilbi, Hubert (2023). Tapping lipid droplets: A rich fat diet of intracellular bacterial pathogens. Molecular Microbiology, 120(2):194-209.

Abstract

Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic and versatile organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. LDs consist of a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids, a phospholipid monolayer coat, and a variety of associated proteins. LDs are formed at the endoplasmic reticulum and have diverse roles in lipid storage, energy metabolism, membrane trafficking, and cellular signaling. In addition to their physiological cellular functions, LDs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including metabolic disorders, cancer, and infections. A number of intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate and/or interact with LDs during host cell infection. Members of the genera Mycobacterium, Legionella, Coxiella, Chlamydia, and Salmonella exploit LDs as a source of intracellular nutrients and membrane components to establish their distinct intracellular replicative niches. In this review, we focus on the biogenesis, interactions, and functions of LDs, as well as on their role in lipid metabolism of intracellular bacterial pathogens.

Abstract

Lipid droplets (LDs) are dynamic and versatile organelles present in most eukaryotic cells. LDs consist of a hydrophobic core of neutral lipids, a phospholipid monolayer coat, and a variety of associated proteins. LDs are formed at the endoplasmic reticulum and have diverse roles in lipid storage, energy metabolism, membrane trafficking, and cellular signaling. In addition to their physiological cellular functions, LDs have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including metabolic disorders, cancer, and infections. A number of intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate and/or interact with LDs during host cell infection. Members of the genera Mycobacterium, Legionella, Coxiella, Chlamydia, and Salmonella exploit LDs as a source of intracellular nutrients and membrane components to establish their distinct intracellular replicative niches. In this review, we focus on the biogenesis, interactions, and functions of LDs, as well as on their role in lipid metabolism of intracellular bacterial pathogens.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Food Safety and Hygiene
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Molecular Biology
Language:English
Date:1 August 2023
Deposited On:04 Jan 2024 10:38
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0950-382X
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/mmi.15120
PubMed ID:37429596
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)