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Long‐term outcomes after paediatric sepsis (LOTUS)–A protocol for an Australian cohort study


Minogue, Jessicah; Schlapbach, Luregn J; Keogh, Samantha; Gibbons, Kristen; Long, Debbie (2024). Long‐term outcomes after paediatric sepsis (LOTUS)–A protocol for an Australian cohort study. Nursing in Critical Care, 29(2):438-443.

Abstract

Background: Globally, sepsis has been identified as one of the leading causes of preventable childhood mortality and morbidity. Previous studies on intensive care patients estimated that approximately 30% of children with sepsis experience some form of disability at discharge. Development of care has seen growing numbers of children treated for sepsis not requiring a PICU admission; however, outcomes in this population are yet to be understood. Further focus is required to understand sepsis survivorship across the wider population to address knowledge gaps and morbidity burden in the broader surviving population.

Aims: To assess the cognitive, physical, emotional and social health of children surviving sepsis 2 years after hospital discharge.

Study design: A prospective, observational cohort study.

Results: Two hundred and thirty-two children will be screened, 2 years after their hospital admission, and approached for participation in this study. Children who are <18 years of age at follow-up, treated for sepsis-related organ dysfunction or septic shock in Queensland between October 2018 and December 2019, will be included. Children who are deceased at follow-up, under care of the state, or require English interpreters will be excluded from participation. Data will be collected through an online follow-up survey comprising validated caregiver-reported questionnaires covering the four Post Intensive Care Syndrome-paediatrics (PICS-p) domains (cognitive, physical, emotional and social health; Manning et al. Pediatr Crit Care Med, 2018, 19, 298-300). The primary outcome is an adaptive behaviour of the participants assessed using the Vinelands-3 tool. Secondary outcomes will include neurodevelopment, quality of life, child distress, overall function, executive function, caregiver's distress and caregiver's stress. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's exact test/chi-squared tests will be used for statistical analyses. No adjustments will be made for multiple comparisons but it is acknowledged that comparisons made in this study are exploratory.

Relevance to clinical practice: With more children surviving sepsis, there is a need for a more comprehensive assessment of patient and family outcomes to allow support structures for families leaving the hospital after sepsis. This study is expected to inform clinicians and stakeholders of patient and family well-being after sepsis survivorship.

Abstract

Background: Globally, sepsis has been identified as one of the leading causes of preventable childhood mortality and morbidity. Previous studies on intensive care patients estimated that approximately 30% of children with sepsis experience some form of disability at discharge. Development of care has seen growing numbers of children treated for sepsis not requiring a PICU admission; however, outcomes in this population are yet to be understood. Further focus is required to understand sepsis survivorship across the wider population to address knowledge gaps and morbidity burden in the broader surviving population.

Aims: To assess the cognitive, physical, emotional and social health of children surviving sepsis 2 years after hospital discharge.

Study design: A prospective, observational cohort study.

Results: Two hundred and thirty-two children will be screened, 2 years after their hospital admission, and approached for participation in this study. Children who are <18 years of age at follow-up, treated for sepsis-related organ dysfunction or septic shock in Queensland between October 2018 and December 2019, will be included. Children who are deceased at follow-up, under care of the state, or require English interpreters will be excluded from participation. Data will be collected through an online follow-up survey comprising validated caregiver-reported questionnaires covering the four Post Intensive Care Syndrome-paediatrics (PICS-p) domains (cognitive, physical, emotional and social health; Manning et al. Pediatr Crit Care Med, 2018, 19, 298-300). The primary outcome is an adaptive behaviour of the participants assessed using the Vinelands-3 tool. Secondary outcomes will include neurodevelopment, quality of life, child distress, overall function, executive function, caregiver's distress and caregiver's stress. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Kruskal-Wallis and Fisher's exact test/chi-squared tests will be used for statistical analyses. No adjustments will be made for multiple comparisons but it is acknowledged that comparisons made in this study are exploratory.

Relevance to clinical practice: With more children surviving sepsis, there is a need for a more comprehensive assessment of patient and family outcomes to allow support structures for families leaving the hospital after sepsis. This study is expected to inform clinicians and stakeholders of patient and family well-being after sepsis survivorship.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Critical Care Nursing
Uncontrolled Keywords:Critical Care Nursing; PICS-p; long-term; outcomes; sepsis; survivorship
Language:English
Date:1 March 2024
Deposited On:14 Dec 2023 13:24
Last Modified:31 Mar 2024 03:44
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1362-1017
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/nicc.12938
PubMed ID:37300332
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)