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Skin Distress Screening: Validation of an Efficient One-question Tool


Blom, Tirza; Fieten, Karin B; Kemperman, Patrick M J H; Spillekom-van Koulil, Saskia; Dikmans, Rieky E G (2023). Skin Distress Screening: Validation of an Efficient One-question Tool. Acta Dermato-Venereologica, 103:adv4590.

Abstract

Skin diseases are often accompanied by physical, emotional and social problems, which may negatively impact health-related quality of life and result in skin-related distress. It is essential to identify patients with skin-related distress within the short time-window of an outpatient dermatological visit. Therefore the one-question screening tool, the Distress Thermometer adjusted for skin conditions, was validated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. In 2 medical centres in Amsterdam, 214 patients with a chronic skin disease were invited to complete the Distress Thermometer and additional health-related quality of life questionnaires. To validate the Distress Thermometer, the Skindex29 was used as gold standard. To test test-retest reliability, the questionnaires were answered at 2 different time-points. Severely impaired health-related quality of life was present in 30% of respondents according to the Skindex29 using a cut-off score of 44. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses yielded an area under the curve of 0.813 (standard error 0.04, 95% confidence interval 0.74-0.89). A cut-off score ≥ 4 on the Distress Thermometer provided the optimal ratio of sensitivity (90.7%) to specificity (56.1%). Therefore, for general practice, a cut-off score of ≥ 4 on the Distress Thermometer is advised. The Distress Thermometer seems to be a rapid, valid and reliable screening tool for identifying skin-related distress in patients with a chronic skin disease in the outpatient dermatology setting.

Abstract

Skin diseases are often accompanied by physical, emotional and social problems, which may negatively impact health-related quality of life and result in skin-related distress. It is essential to identify patients with skin-related distress within the short time-window of an outpatient dermatological visit. Therefore the one-question screening tool, the Distress Thermometer adjusted for skin conditions, was validated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. In 2 medical centres in Amsterdam, 214 patients with a chronic skin disease were invited to complete the Distress Thermometer and additional health-related quality of life questionnaires. To validate the Distress Thermometer, the Skindex29 was used as gold standard. To test test-retest reliability, the questionnaires were answered at 2 different time-points. Severely impaired health-related quality of life was present in 30% of respondents according to the Skindex29 using a cut-off score of 44. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses yielded an area under the curve of 0.813 (standard error 0.04, 95% confidence interval 0.74-0.89). A cut-off score ≥ 4 on the Distress Thermometer provided the optimal ratio of sensitivity (90.7%) to specificity (56.1%). Therefore, for general practice, a cut-off score of ≥ 4 on the Distress Thermometer is advised. The Distress Thermometer seems to be a rapid, valid and reliable screening tool for identifying skin-related distress in patients with a chronic skin disease in the outpatient dermatology setting.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Swiss Institute of Allergy and Asthma Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Dermatology
Language:English
Date:10 May 2023
Deposited On:15 Dec 2023 12:42
Last Modified:29 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Society for the Publication of Acta Dermato-Venereologica
ISSN:0001-5555
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2340/actadv.v103.4590
PubMed ID:37165685
Other Identification Number:PMCID: PMC10186388
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)