Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Living in a naturally fragmented world : from extra-pair paternity in local populations to spatial population structure of the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) across Europe


Mayer, Christian. Living in a naturally fragmented world : from extra-pair paternity in local populations to spatial population structure of the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) across Europe. 2010, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

Summary 1

SUMMARY

Species often occur in subdivided populations as a consequence of spatial heterogeneity of the habitat. Destruction and fragmentation of habitats due to human land use generally decrease the size and the connectivity of subdivided populations. Due to deterministic and stochastic effects on demographic and genetic parameters, long-term persistence of subdivided populations may be compromised. Theoretical studies have shown that viability of subdivided populations critically depends on the connectivity among local subpopulations, and population models have been developed which predict extinction risks of subpopulations in relation to different levels of connectivity. The lack of empirical data on how subpopulations are spatially organized makes it difficult to judge the general validity of theoretical population models. In fact, predictions derived from population models have rarely been tested with empirical data, although conservation biology focuses on preventing declines and extinctions of populations. However, traditional population definitions are often simplistic, being based for example on the size of a habitat fragment or the geographic clustering of individuals into different breeding units. These population definitions neglect the genetic boundaries of populations if gene flow occurs. The theoretically predicted positive relationship between population size and genetic diversity, which has been supported by many empirical studies, may therefore not be found if gene flow connects populations. Thus, population size may not allow conclusions about the genetic diversity of local populations, which has implications for conservation management of small populations. However, when studying animal behaviour it is useful to focus on populations defined as groups of individuals that have the opportunity to interact in a particular area at a particular time. According to traditional definitions, species living in habitat fragments scattered throughout the landscape occur in geographically distinct local populations and provide the opportunity to test the generality of behaviours by comparing multiple local populations. An example for a species inhabiting naturally fragmented habitat is the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus), a small Palearctic short-distance migratory songbird restricted to wetlands. Wetlands have been destroyed worldwide due to anthropogenic land use (Keddy 1999). Between the 1970s and early 1990s, considerable declines of the reed bunting have been reported for several European countries, for example Germany, Belgium, Finland and England (Heath et al. 2000). Especially in the intensively used agricultural landscapes of south and west Central Europe, habitat destruction has led to extinction of local populations (Glutz von Blotzheim & Bauer 1997) and to reductions in local population sizes (Blümel Summary 2

1995). The reed bunting is therefore an ideal study species to evaluate the significance of small local populations in population networks and to assess the importance of local population size for the maintenance of genetic diversity in this species. The occurrence of the species in geographically distinct breeding units also provides the opportunity to evaluate the significance of ecological parameters explaining mating-system differences among local populations. A precondition for the analyses of the spatial distribution of genetic variation in subdivided populations, as well as for the analysis of paternity in avian mating-systems, is the availability of polymorphic molecular markers. In chapter 1, I characterized fifteen microsatellite loci specifically designed for the reed bunting. Eleven loci were autosomal and four linked to the Z-chromosome. All loci were characterized and tested in 45 unrelated reed buntings from a Swiss population. Autosomal and z-linked loci were highly polymorphic allowing the inference of spatial genetic structure and the analysis of paternity in reed buntings. In chapter 2, I described the spatial organization of a local system of reed bunting subpopulations. Existing theory proposes three main population models, which predict different levels of connectivity among and extinction risks of subpopulations: patchy population, metapopulation and isolated populations. However, spatially discrete subpopulations are commonly considered to be organized as metapopulations, although explicit tests of metapopulation assumptions are rare. I tested predictions of the three models on the basis of demographic and genetic data, a combined approach so far surprisingly little used in mobile organisms. From 2002-2005, I studied nine subpopulations of the wetland- restricted reed bunting in the southeastern part of the Canton Zurich (Switzerland), from where local declines of the species had been reported. Here, wetlands can be as small as 2.7 ha, often host very few breeding pairs and are separated through intensively used agricultural landscapes. Demographic data referred to dispersal of colour-banded individuals among subpopulations, immigration rates and extinction-/recolonization dynamics. Genetic data were based on the distribution of genetic variability and gene flow among subpopulations derived from the analysis of nine microsatellite loci. Both demographic and genetic data revealed that the patchy population model best described the spatial organization of reed bunting subpopulations. High levels of dispersal among subpopulations, high immigration into the patchy population, and genetic admixture suggested little risk of extinction of both subpopulations and the entire patchy population. This study exemplifies that spatially discrete Summary 3

subpopulations may be organized in ways other than a metapopulation, which has implications for the conservation of subpopulations and species. In chapter 3, I investigated the importance of local population sizes for the maintenance of genetic diversity in the reed bunting. Reduction of genetic diversity due to genetic drift depends on population effective size, which is often correlated with local population size, i.e. population census or breeding size. However, if gene flow is high, the genetic boundaries of a local population may greatly exceed the geographic area originally used for population delineation. As a consequence, the predicted positive relationship between local population size and genetic diversity may not be found. In reed buntings, the distribution and size of local populations is restricted according to the distribution and size of wetlands. I show that genetic diversity of local reed bunting populations depended on regional abundance of the species rather than on local population sizes, which is in accordance with the high level of gene flow we found among reed bunting populations across Europe. Genetic diversity increased with latitude and was highest in Scandinavia (samples from Norway, located along the presumed centre of the species' distribution range), and lowest in south-central Europe (samples from Switzerland, located along the southern edge of its distribution range). At the species' southern range margin, increased temporal variability in population sizes may have reduced population long-term effective sizes and thus genetic diversity. A further reduction of genetic diversity may be counterbalanced if conservation efforts focus on the protection of remaining wetlands, enhancing habitat quality and thus ultimately population sizes. In chapter 4, I studied the relation between population density and variation of extra- pair paternity (EPP) in reed buntings. Density has been suggested to affect variation of EPP within avian species, because it increases encounter rates and mating opportunities when individuals search for potential extra-pair mates. So far, the significance of density affecting EPP variation in intraspecific comparisons is controversial. However, the absence of a relationship between density and EPP in within- and among-population comparisons as revealed by many empirical studies may mostly be attributed to potentially confounding factors and poor study design. Density measures may not always reflect extra-pair mating opportunities, mate guarding efforts may vary with density, different migration distances and climatic conditions could cause population differences in EPP, and low variation in density and small sample sizes weaken the test power. Taking all those factors into account, I tested if EPP rates within and among local reed bunting populations were related to density. My analyses were based on data from 18 local populations studied over four years. Within populations, the proportion of extra-pair young (EPY) in broods was positively related to Summary 4

local breeding density. Similarly, among local populations, proportion of EPY was positively associated with population density. I also show that EPP was absent where populations consisted of a single breeding pair, i.e. when no extra-pair mating opportunities were available. My study confirms that density is an important biological factor, which significantly influences the amount of EPP within and among populations, but also supports the view that additional mechanisms contribute to EPP variation. Zusammenfassung 5

ZUSAMMENFASSUNG

Als Konsequenz aus der räumlichen Heterogenität ihres Habitats kommen Arten oft in fragmentierten Populationen vor. Zerstörung und Fragmentation des Habitats durch anthro- pogene Nutzung verringern nicht nur die Grösse, sondern auch die Vernetzung fragmentierter Populationen. Das Langzeitüberleben fragmentierter Populationen ist aufgrund determin- istischer und stochastischer Effekte, die Demographie und Genetik fragmentierter Popula- tionen stark beeinflussen können, möglicherweise vermindert. Theoretische Studien haben gezeigt, dass das Langzeitüberleben fragmentierter Populationen stark von der Vernetzung lokaler Subpopulationen abhängt, und es wurden Populationsmodelle entwickelt, die die Vernetzung und das Aussterberisiko solcher Subpopulationen vorhersagen. Die generelle Aussagekraft theoretischer Populationsmodelle lässt sich aber nur schwer feststellen, da wenig empirische Daten zur Verfügung stehen. Die Voraussagen theoretischer Populations- modelle wurden bisher auch nur selten getestet, obwohl ein ganzer Forschungsbereich, die Naturschutzbiologie, einen ihrer Schwerpunkte darin sieht Bestandsabnahmen und das Aus- sterben von Populationen zu verhindern. Traditionelle Definitionen einer Population sind in der Regel vereinfachend, da sie beispielsweise Individuen aufgrund geographischer Gegeben- heiten in verschiedene Gruppen aufteilen. Diese traditionellen Populationsdefinitionen beachten dabei nicht, dass Populationen über Genfluss miteinander in Verbindung stehen können. Die Grösse einer Population wird häufig als Mass dafür genommen, ob eine Population ausreichend genetisch divers ist, um langfristig überleben zu können. Für durch Genfluss vernetzte Populationen hätte die theoretische Vorhersage, dass die genetische Diversität einer Population von ihrer Grösse abhängt, keine Gültigkeit mehr, woraus sich Folgerungen für den Schutz kleiner Populationen ableiten lassen. In Abhängigkeit vom biologischen Kontext einer Studie oder Fragestellung können traditionelle Populations- definitionen aber durchaus sinnvoll sein. Wenn zum Beispiel das Verhalten von Tieren untersucht wird, ist es sinnvoll eine Population so zu definieren, dass sie die Interaktionen von Individuen an einem bestimmten Ort und zu einer bestimmten Zeit umfasst. Ausgehend von traditionellen Populationsdefinitionen kommen Arten, die in fragmentierten Landschaften leben, in geographisch distinkten lokalen Populationen vor. Dies bietet die Möglichkeit Verhalten in verschiedenen Populationen zu untersuchen und zwischen verschiedenen Populationen zu vergleichen. Ein Beispiel für eine in natürlich fragmentiertem Habitat vorkommende Art ist die Rohrammer (Emberiza schoeniclus). Diese paläarktisch verbreitete Singvogelart ist ein Zusammenfassung 6

Kurzstreckenzieher dessen Vorkommen sich auf Feuchtgebiete beschränkt. Feuchtgebiete wurden und werden durch anthropogene Nutzung weltweit zerstört. Aufgrund dessen nahm zwischen den Siebziger und Neunziger Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts der Rohrammer- bestand in verschiedenen europäischen Ländern wie Deutschland, Belgien, Finnland oder England ab. Besonders in den südlichen und westlichen, landwirtschaftlich intensiv genutzten Teilen Mitteleuropas hat die Zerstörung der Feuchtgebiete zu Bestandsabnahmen und zum Aussterben lokaler Rohrammerpopulationen geführt. Aufgrund ihrer Habitatspezifität ist die Rohrammer eine ideale Art, um die Bedeutung kleiner Populationen in Populationsnetz- werken sowie die Bedeutung von Populationsgrössen für den Erhalt genetischer Diversität zu untersuchen. Dass die Rohrammer in geographisch distinkten Gruppen brütet, ermöglicht es ausserdem den Einfluss ökologischer Parameter auf Aspekte des Paarungssystems der Rohrammer zwischen verschiedenen geographisch distinkten Populationen zu vergleichen. Eine Voraussetzung für derartige Analysen ist die Verwendung polymorpher molekularer Marker. In Kapitel 1 charakterisiere ich fünfzehn Mikrosatellitenloci, die spezifisch für die Rohrammer entwickelt wurden. Elf dieser Loci waren autosomal, die restlichen vier geschlechtsspezifisch (d.h. sie lagen auf dem Z-Chromosom). Alle Loci wurden in 45 nicht miteinander verwandten Rohrammern einer schweizer Population charakterisiert und getestet. Sowohl die autosomalen als auch die z-gelinkten Loci waren hochpolymorph, was die Untersuchung der räumlichen genetischen Struktur von Rohrammer- populationen und von Vaterschaftsanalysen möglich machte. In Kapitel 2 beschreibe ich die räumliche Organisation eines lokalen Systems von Rohrammersubpopulationen. Aus der Theorie sind drei Populationsmodelle bekannt, die Voraussagen über Vernetzung und Aussterbeereignisse lokaler Subpopulationen machen. Herkömmlicherweise nimmt man für geographisch diskrete Subpopulationen eine Metapopulationsstruktur an. Tests, die überprüfen, ob die räumliche Organisation der Subpopulationen die Annahmen einer Metapopulation auch erfüllt, sind allerdings selten. Ich testete die Voraussagen dreier Populationsmodelle auf der Grundlage demographischer und genetischer Daten. Dieser kombinierte Ansatz wurde bis jetzt erstaunlich selten gewählt, zumindest für mobile Organismen. Zwischen 2002 und 2005 untersuchte ich neun Sub- populationen der Rohrammer im südöstlichen Teil des Kantons Zürich (Schweiz), von wo vereinzelt Bestandsrückgänge der Art beschrieben wurden. In diesem Teil des schweiz- erischen Mittellandes sind Feuchtgebiete teilweise nur 2.7 ha gross und durch landwirt- schaftlich intensiv genutzte Flächen voneinander getrennt. Farbberingte Individuen lieferten demographischen Daten über die Dispersion zwischen Subpopulationen, Immigrationsraten Zusammenfassung 7

und Aussterbe- und Wiederbesiedlungsereignissen. Die genetischen Daten basierten auf der molekularen Information von neun Mikrosatellitenloci und beschreiben die Verteilung genetischer Variation sowie den Genflusses zwischen den Subpopulationen. Sowohl die demographischen als auch die genetischen Daten zeigen, dass die Organisation der Sub- population am besten durch das Modell der 'Patchy population' beschrieben wird. Das hohe Mass an Dispersal zwischen den Subpopulationen, die hohe Immigrationsrate in die gesamte 'Patchy population' und die fehlende genetische Differenzierung zeigen, dass sowohl für die einzelnen Subpopulationen als auch für die gesamt 'Patchy population' nur eine geringe Aussterbewahrscheinlichkeit besteht. Diese Studie ist ein Beispiel dafür, dass geographisch diskrete Subpopulationen räumlich durchaus anders als Metapopulationen organisiert sein können, woraus sich bestimmte Folgerungen für den Schutz von Subpopulationen und Arten ableiten lassen. In Kapitel 3 untersuchte ich die Bedeutung lokaler Populationsgrössen für den Erhalt genetischer Diversität am Beispiel der Rohrammer. Die Verringerung genetischer Diversität durch genetische Drift hängt generell von der effektiven Populationsgrösse ab, die oft mit der lokalen Populationsgrösse korreliert ist. Lokale Populationsgrössen werden meist als die Anzahl der lokalen Individuen oder als die Anzahl brütender Individuen angegeben. Wenn Genfluss zwischen lokalen Populationen hoch ist, kann die genetische Abgrenzung einer lokalen Population allerdings den ursprünglich für die Populationsdefinition benutzten lokalen geographischen Rahmen bei weitem überschreiten. Der theoretische vorhergesagte Zusam- menhang zwischen lokaler Populationsgrösse und dem Ausmass genetischer Diversität kann dadurch möglicherweise nicht mehr gefunden werden. Bei der Rohrammer sind lokale Populationsgrössen von der Verteilung und der Grösse von Feuchtgebieten abhängig. In dieser Studie zeige ich, dass aufgrund hohen Genflusses die genetische Diversität lokaler Rohrammerpopulationen von der regionalen Dichte der Rohrammer und nicht von den lokalen Populationsgrössen abhängt. Mit zunehmendem Breitengrad nahm die genetische Diversität zu und war am höchsten in Skandinavien (Norwegen) und am niedrigsten am südlichen Rand des Rohrammerverbreitungsgebiets (Schweiz). Temporäre Veränderungen der lokalen Populationsgrössen über längere Zeiträume hinweg könnten dazu geführt haben, dass die durchschnittlichen effektiven Populationsgrössen und damit auch die genetische Diversität am südlichen Rand des Verbreitungsgebiets abnahmen. Der weiteren Abnahme genetischer Diversität könnte allerdings durch geeignete Schutzmassnahmen entgegengewirkt werden, wenn diese Massnahmen eine Qualitätsverbesserung des Rohrammerhabitats und damit letztlich auch eine Vergrösserung der lokalen Populationen zur Folge haben. Zusammenfassung 8

In Kapitel 4 untersuchte ich den Einfluss der Brutdichte auf die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften bei der Rohrammer. Theoretisch gesehen führt zunehmende Dichte einerseits dazu, dass sich Männchen und Weibchen ausserhalb des sozialen Paarbundes häufiger begegnen. Andererseits ergeben sich mit zunehmender Dichte generell mehr Möglichkeiten einen potentiellen Partner für das Fremdgehen zu finden. Allerdings hat sich bisher die Bedeutung der Dichte als Erklärung für die hohe Variation im Ausmass von Fremdvaterschaften zwischen verschiedenen Populationen derselben Art nicht als sehr überzeugend herausgestellt. Dass viele Studien keinen Zusammenhang zwischen Dichte und der Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften gefunden haben ist möglicherweise eine Folge ihres methodischen Aufbaus, beziehungsweise der Nichtberücksichtigung von Faktoren, die das Untersuchungsergebnis beeinträchtigt haben könnten. Die in diesen Studien verwendeten Masse für Dichte spiegelten nicht immer die Möglichkeit des Fremdgehens wider. Unterschiedliche Migrationsdistanzen und klimatische Verhältnisse zwischen Populationen könnten ebenfalls Ergebnisse verfälscht haben. Hinzu kommt, dass sowohl eine zu geringe Bandbreite an Dichten, unter denen die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften gemessen wurde, als auch eine zu geringe Stichprobengrösse die Aussagekraft der verwendeten Tests verringert haben könnten. Unter Berücksichtigung all dieser Faktoren testete ich, ob es einen Zusammenhang zwischen der Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften innerhalb und zwischen verschiedenen lokalen Rohrammerpopulationen und der jeweiligen Dichte gab. Meine Analysen basierten auf Daten von 18 lokalen Populationen, die während vier Jahren untersucht wurden. Innerhalb der Populationen war die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften positiv mit der lokalen Brutdichte korreliert. Beim Vergleich zwischen verschiedenen Populationen waren Häufigkeiten von Fremdvaterschaften positiv mit der Populationsdichte korreliert. In lokalen Populationen, die nur aus einem einzigen Brutpaar bestanden und in denen es somit keine Möglichkeit des Fremdgehens gab, kam es auch nie zu Fremd- vaterschaften. Damit bestätige ich in meiner Studie die Hypothese, dass Dichte tatsächlich ein biologisch relevanter Faktor ist, der einen signifikanten Einfluss auf die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften innerhalb und zwischen verschiedenen Populationen hat. Darüber hinaus bestätigen meine Ergebnisse die Ansicht, dass neben der Dichte weitere Mechanismen die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften beeinflussen.

Abstract

Summary 1

SUMMARY

Species often occur in subdivided populations as a consequence of spatial heterogeneity of the habitat. Destruction and fragmentation of habitats due to human land use generally decrease the size and the connectivity of subdivided populations. Due to deterministic and stochastic effects on demographic and genetic parameters, long-term persistence of subdivided populations may be compromised. Theoretical studies have shown that viability of subdivided populations critically depends on the connectivity among local subpopulations, and population models have been developed which predict extinction risks of subpopulations in relation to different levels of connectivity. The lack of empirical data on how subpopulations are spatially organized makes it difficult to judge the general validity of theoretical population models. In fact, predictions derived from population models have rarely been tested with empirical data, although conservation biology focuses on preventing declines and extinctions of populations. However, traditional population definitions are often simplistic, being based for example on the size of a habitat fragment or the geographic clustering of individuals into different breeding units. These population definitions neglect the genetic boundaries of populations if gene flow occurs. The theoretically predicted positive relationship between population size and genetic diversity, which has been supported by many empirical studies, may therefore not be found if gene flow connects populations. Thus, population size may not allow conclusions about the genetic diversity of local populations, which has implications for conservation management of small populations. However, when studying animal behaviour it is useful to focus on populations defined as groups of individuals that have the opportunity to interact in a particular area at a particular time. According to traditional definitions, species living in habitat fragments scattered throughout the landscape occur in geographically distinct local populations and provide the opportunity to test the generality of behaviours by comparing multiple local populations. An example for a species inhabiting naturally fragmented habitat is the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus), a small Palearctic short-distance migratory songbird restricted to wetlands. Wetlands have been destroyed worldwide due to anthropogenic land use (Keddy 1999). Between the 1970s and early 1990s, considerable declines of the reed bunting have been reported for several European countries, for example Germany, Belgium, Finland and England (Heath et al. 2000). Especially in the intensively used agricultural landscapes of south and west Central Europe, habitat destruction has led to extinction of local populations (Glutz von Blotzheim & Bauer 1997) and to reductions in local population sizes (Blümel Summary 2

1995). The reed bunting is therefore an ideal study species to evaluate the significance of small local populations in population networks and to assess the importance of local population size for the maintenance of genetic diversity in this species. The occurrence of the species in geographically distinct breeding units also provides the opportunity to evaluate the significance of ecological parameters explaining mating-system differences among local populations. A precondition for the analyses of the spatial distribution of genetic variation in subdivided populations, as well as for the analysis of paternity in avian mating-systems, is the availability of polymorphic molecular markers. In chapter 1, I characterized fifteen microsatellite loci specifically designed for the reed bunting. Eleven loci were autosomal and four linked to the Z-chromosome. All loci were characterized and tested in 45 unrelated reed buntings from a Swiss population. Autosomal and z-linked loci were highly polymorphic allowing the inference of spatial genetic structure and the analysis of paternity in reed buntings. In chapter 2, I described the spatial organization of a local system of reed bunting subpopulations. Existing theory proposes three main population models, which predict different levels of connectivity among and extinction risks of subpopulations: patchy population, metapopulation and isolated populations. However, spatially discrete subpopulations are commonly considered to be organized as metapopulations, although explicit tests of metapopulation assumptions are rare. I tested predictions of the three models on the basis of demographic and genetic data, a combined approach so far surprisingly little used in mobile organisms. From 2002-2005, I studied nine subpopulations of the wetland- restricted reed bunting in the southeastern part of the Canton Zurich (Switzerland), from where local declines of the species had been reported. Here, wetlands can be as small as 2.7 ha, often host very few breeding pairs and are separated through intensively used agricultural landscapes. Demographic data referred to dispersal of colour-banded individuals among subpopulations, immigration rates and extinction-/recolonization dynamics. Genetic data were based on the distribution of genetic variability and gene flow among subpopulations derived from the analysis of nine microsatellite loci. Both demographic and genetic data revealed that the patchy population model best described the spatial organization of reed bunting subpopulations. High levels of dispersal among subpopulations, high immigration into the patchy population, and genetic admixture suggested little risk of extinction of both subpopulations and the entire patchy population. This study exemplifies that spatially discrete Summary 3

subpopulations may be organized in ways other than a metapopulation, which has implications for the conservation of subpopulations and species. In chapter 3, I investigated the importance of local population sizes for the maintenance of genetic diversity in the reed bunting. Reduction of genetic diversity due to genetic drift depends on population effective size, which is often correlated with local population size, i.e. population census or breeding size. However, if gene flow is high, the genetic boundaries of a local population may greatly exceed the geographic area originally used for population delineation. As a consequence, the predicted positive relationship between local population size and genetic diversity may not be found. In reed buntings, the distribution and size of local populations is restricted according to the distribution and size of wetlands. I show that genetic diversity of local reed bunting populations depended on regional abundance of the species rather than on local population sizes, which is in accordance with the high level of gene flow we found among reed bunting populations across Europe. Genetic diversity increased with latitude and was highest in Scandinavia (samples from Norway, located along the presumed centre of the species' distribution range), and lowest in south-central Europe (samples from Switzerland, located along the southern edge of its distribution range). At the species' southern range margin, increased temporal variability in population sizes may have reduced population long-term effective sizes and thus genetic diversity. A further reduction of genetic diversity may be counterbalanced if conservation efforts focus on the protection of remaining wetlands, enhancing habitat quality and thus ultimately population sizes. In chapter 4, I studied the relation between population density and variation of extra- pair paternity (EPP) in reed buntings. Density has been suggested to affect variation of EPP within avian species, because it increases encounter rates and mating opportunities when individuals search for potential extra-pair mates. So far, the significance of density affecting EPP variation in intraspecific comparisons is controversial. However, the absence of a relationship between density and EPP in within- and among-population comparisons as revealed by many empirical studies may mostly be attributed to potentially confounding factors and poor study design. Density measures may not always reflect extra-pair mating opportunities, mate guarding efforts may vary with density, different migration distances and climatic conditions could cause population differences in EPP, and low variation in density and small sample sizes weaken the test power. Taking all those factors into account, I tested if EPP rates within and among local reed bunting populations were related to density. My analyses were based on data from 18 local populations studied over four years. Within populations, the proportion of extra-pair young (EPY) in broods was positively related to Summary 4

local breeding density. Similarly, among local populations, proportion of EPY was positively associated with population density. I also show that EPP was absent where populations consisted of a single breeding pair, i.e. when no extra-pair mating opportunities were available. My study confirms that density is an important biological factor, which significantly influences the amount of EPP within and among populations, but also supports the view that additional mechanisms contribute to EPP variation. Zusammenfassung 5

ZUSAMMENFASSUNG

Als Konsequenz aus der räumlichen Heterogenität ihres Habitats kommen Arten oft in fragmentierten Populationen vor. Zerstörung und Fragmentation des Habitats durch anthro- pogene Nutzung verringern nicht nur die Grösse, sondern auch die Vernetzung fragmentierter Populationen. Das Langzeitüberleben fragmentierter Populationen ist aufgrund determin- istischer und stochastischer Effekte, die Demographie und Genetik fragmentierter Popula- tionen stark beeinflussen können, möglicherweise vermindert. Theoretische Studien haben gezeigt, dass das Langzeitüberleben fragmentierter Populationen stark von der Vernetzung lokaler Subpopulationen abhängt, und es wurden Populationsmodelle entwickelt, die die Vernetzung und das Aussterberisiko solcher Subpopulationen vorhersagen. Die generelle Aussagekraft theoretischer Populationsmodelle lässt sich aber nur schwer feststellen, da wenig empirische Daten zur Verfügung stehen. Die Voraussagen theoretischer Populations- modelle wurden bisher auch nur selten getestet, obwohl ein ganzer Forschungsbereich, die Naturschutzbiologie, einen ihrer Schwerpunkte darin sieht Bestandsabnahmen und das Aus- sterben von Populationen zu verhindern. Traditionelle Definitionen einer Population sind in der Regel vereinfachend, da sie beispielsweise Individuen aufgrund geographischer Gegeben- heiten in verschiedene Gruppen aufteilen. Diese traditionellen Populationsdefinitionen beachten dabei nicht, dass Populationen über Genfluss miteinander in Verbindung stehen können. Die Grösse einer Population wird häufig als Mass dafür genommen, ob eine Population ausreichend genetisch divers ist, um langfristig überleben zu können. Für durch Genfluss vernetzte Populationen hätte die theoretische Vorhersage, dass die genetische Diversität einer Population von ihrer Grösse abhängt, keine Gültigkeit mehr, woraus sich Folgerungen für den Schutz kleiner Populationen ableiten lassen. In Abhängigkeit vom biologischen Kontext einer Studie oder Fragestellung können traditionelle Populations- definitionen aber durchaus sinnvoll sein. Wenn zum Beispiel das Verhalten von Tieren untersucht wird, ist es sinnvoll eine Population so zu definieren, dass sie die Interaktionen von Individuen an einem bestimmten Ort und zu einer bestimmten Zeit umfasst. Ausgehend von traditionellen Populationsdefinitionen kommen Arten, die in fragmentierten Landschaften leben, in geographisch distinkten lokalen Populationen vor. Dies bietet die Möglichkeit Verhalten in verschiedenen Populationen zu untersuchen und zwischen verschiedenen Populationen zu vergleichen. Ein Beispiel für eine in natürlich fragmentiertem Habitat vorkommende Art ist die Rohrammer (Emberiza schoeniclus). Diese paläarktisch verbreitete Singvogelart ist ein Zusammenfassung 6

Kurzstreckenzieher dessen Vorkommen sich auf Feuchtgebiete beschränkt. Feuchtgebiete wurden und werden durch anthropogene Nutzung weltweit zerstört. Aufgrund dessen nahm zwischen den Siebziger und Neunziger Jahren des letzten Jahrhunderts der Rohrammer- bestand in verschiedenen europäischen Ländern wie Deutschland, Belgien, Finnland oder England ab. Besonders in den südlichen und westlichen, landwirtschaftlich intensiv genutzten Teilen Mitteleuropas hat die Zerstörung der Feuchtgebiete zu Bestandsabnahmen und zum Aussterben lokaler Rohrammerpopulationen geführt. Aufgrund ihrer Habitatspezifität ist die Rohrammer eine ideale Art, um die Bedeutung kleiner Populationen in Populationsnetz- werken sowie die Bedeutung von Populationsgrössen für den Erhalt genetischer Diversität zu untersuchen. Dass die Rohrammer in geographisch distinkten Gruppen brütet, ermöglicht es ausserdem den Einfluss ökologischer Parameter auf Aspekte des Paarungssystems der Rohrammer zwischen verschiedenen geographisch distinkten Populationen zu vergleichen. Eine Voraussetzung für derartige Analysen ist die Verwendung polymorpher molekularer Marker. In Kapitel 1 charakterisiere ich fünfzehn Mikrosatellitenloci, die spezifisch für die Rohrammer entwickelt wurden. Elf dieser Loci waren autosomal, die restlichen vier geschlechtsspezifisch (d.h. sie lagen auf dem Z-Chromosom). Alle Loci wurden in 45 nicht miteinander verwandten Rohrammern einer schweizer Population charakterisiert und getestet. Sowohl die autosomalen als auch die z-gelinkten Loci waren hochpolymorph, was die Untersuchung der räumlichen genetischen Struktur von Rohrammer- populationen und von Vaterschaftsanalysen möglich machte. In Kapitel 2 beschreibe ich die räumliche Organisation eines lokalen Systems von Rohrammersubpopulationen. Aus der Theorie sind drei Populationsmodelle bekannt, die Voraussagen über Vernetzung und Aussterbeereignisse lokaler Subpopulationen machen. Herkömmlicherweise nimmt man für geographisch diskrete Subpopulationen eine Metapopulationsstruktur an. Tests, die überprüfen, ob die räumliche Organisation der Subpopulationen die Annahmen einer Metapopulation auch erfüllt, sind allerdings selten. Ich testete die Voraussagen dreier Populationsmodelle auf der Grundlage demographischer und genetischer Daten. Dieser kombinierte Ansatz wurde bis jetzt erstaunlich selten gewählt, zumindest für mobile Organismen. Zwischen 2002 und 2005 untersuchte ich neun Sub- populationen der Rohrammer im südöstlichen Teil des Kantons Zürich (Schweiz), von wo vereinzelt Bestandsrückgänge der Art beschrieben wurden. In diesem Teil des schweiz- erischen Mittellandes sind Feuchtgebiete teilweise nur 2.7 ha gross und durch landwirt- schaftlich intensiv genutzte Flächen voneinander getrennt. Farbberingte Individuen lieferten demographischen Daten über die Dispersion zwischen Subpopulationen, Immigrationsraten Zusammenfassung 7

und Aussterbe- und Wiederbesiedlungsereignissen. Die genetischen Daten basierten auf der molekularen Information von neun Mikrosatellitenloci und beschreiben die Verteilung genetischer Variation sowie den Genflusses zwischen den Subpopulationen. Sowohl die demographischen als auch die genetischen Daten zeigen, dass die Organisation der Sub- population am besten durch das Modell der 'Patchy population' beschrieben wird. Das hohe Mass an Dispersal zwischen den Subpopulationen, die hohe Immigrationsrate in die gesamte 'Patchy population' und die fehlende genetische Differenzierung zeigen, dass sowohl für die einzelnen Subpopulationen als auch für die gesamt 'Patchy population' nur eine geringe Aussterbewahrscheinlichkeit besteht. Diese Studie ist ein Beispiel dafür, dass geographisch diskrete Subpopulationen räumlich durchaus anders als Metapopulationen organisiert sein können, woraus sich bestimmte Folgerungen für den Schutz von Subpopulationen und Arten ableiten lassen. In Kapitel 3 untersuchte ich die Bedeutung lokaler Populationsgrössen für den Erhalt genetischer Diversität am Beispiel der Rohrammer. Die Verringerung genetischer Diversität durch genetische Drift hängt generell von der effektiven Populationsgrösse ab, die oft mit der lokalen Populationsgrösse korreliert ist. Lokale Populationsgrössen werden meist als die Anzahl der lokalen Individuen oder als die Anzahl brütender Individuen angegeben. Wenn Genfluss zwischen lokalen Populationen hoch ist, kann die genetische Abgrenzung einer lokalen Population allerdings den ursprünglich für die Populationsdefinition benutzten lokalen geographischen Rahmen bei weitem überschreiten. Der theoretische vorhergesagte Zusam- menhang zwischen lokaler Populationsgrösse und dem Ausmass genetischer Diversität kann dadurch möglicherweise nicht mehr gefunden werden. Bei der Rohrammer sind lokale Populationsgrössen von der Verteilung und der Grösse von Feuchtgebieten abhängig. In dieser Studie zeige ich, dass aufgrund hohen Genflusses die genetische Diversität lokaler Rohrammerpopulationen von der regionalen Dichte der Rohrammer und nicht von den lokalen Populationsgrössen abhängt. Mit zunehmendem Breitengrad nahm die genetische Diversität zu und war am höchsten in Skandinavien (Norwegen) und am niedrigsten am südlichen Rand des Rohrammerverbreitungsgebiets (Schweiz). Temporäre Veränderungen der lokalen Populationsgrössen über längere Zeiträume hinweg könnten dazu geführt haben, dass die durchschnittlichen effektiven Populationsgrössen und damit auch die genetische Diversität am südlichen Rand des Verbreitungsgebiets abnahmen. Der weiteren Abnahme genetischer Diversität könnte allerdings durch geeignete Schutzmassnahmen entgegengewirkt werden, wenn diese Massnahmen eine Qualitätsverbesserung des Rohrammerhabitats und damit letztlich auch eine Vergrösserung der lokalen Populationen zur Folge haben. Zusammenfassung 8

In Kapitel 4 untersuchte ich den Einfluss der Brutdichte auf die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften bei der Rohrammer. Theoretisch gesehen führt zunehmende Dichte einerseits dazu, dass sich Männchen und Weibchen ausserhalb des sozialen Paarbundes häufiger begegnen. Andererseits ergeben sich mit zunehmender Dichte generell mehr Möglichkeiten einen potentiellen Partner für das Fremdgehen zu finden. Allerdings hat sich bisher die Bedeutung der Dichte als Erklärung für die hohe Variation im Ausmass von Fremdvaterschaften zwischen verschiedenen Populationen derselben Art nicht als sehr überzeugend herausgestellt. Dass viele Studien keinen Zusammenhang zwischen Dichte und der Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften gefunden haben ist möglicherweise eine Folge ihres methodischen Aufbaus, beziehungsweise der Nichtberücksichtigung von Faktoren, die das Untersuchungsergebnis beeinträchtigt haben könnten. Die in diesen Studien verwendeten Masse für Dichte spiegelten nicht immer die Möglichkeit des Fremdgehens wider. Unterschiedliche Migrationsdistanzen und klimatische Verhältnisse zwischen Populationen könnten ebenfalls Ergebnisse verfälscht haben. Hinzu kommt, dass sowohl eine zu geringe Bandbreite an Dichten, unter denen die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften gemessen wurde, als auch eine zu geringe Stichprobengrösse die Aussagekraft der verwendeten Tests verringert haben könnten. Unter Berücksichtigung all dieser Faktoren testete ich, ob es einen Zusammenhang zwischen der Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften innerhalb und zwischen verschiedenen lokalen Rohrammerpopulationen und der jeweiligen Dichte gab. Meine Analysen basierten auf Daten von 18 lokalen Populationen, die während vier Jahren untersucht wurden. Innerhalb der Populationen war die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften positiv mit der lokalen Brutdichte korreliert. Beim Vergleich zwischen verschiedenen Populationen waren Häufigkeiten von Fremdvaterschaften positiv mit der Populationsdichte korreliert. In lokalen Populationen, die nur aus einem einzigen Brutpaar bestanden und in denen es somit keine Möglichkeit des Fremdgehens gab, kam es auch nie zu Fremd- vaterschaften. Damit bestätige ich in meiner Studie die Hypothese, dass Dichte tatsächlich ein biologisch relevanter Faktor ist, der einen signifikanten Einfluss auf die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften innerhalb und zwischen verschiedenen Populationen hat. Darüber hinaus bestätigen meine Ergebnisse die Ansicht, dass neben der Dichte weitere Mechanismen die Häufigkeit von Fremdvaterschaften beeinflussen.

Statistics

Downloads

450 downloads since deposited on 02 Dec 2009
40 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (monographical)
Referees:Reyer Heinz-Ulrich, Pasinelli Gilberto
Communities & Collections:UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:2010
Deposited On:02 Dec 2009 07:54
Last Modified:24 Sep 2019 16:24
Number of Pages:113
Additional Information:Enthält Sonderdrucke
OA Status:Green
Related URLs:https://www.recherche-portal.ch/primo-explore/fulldisplay?docid=ebi01_prod006130989&context=L&vid=ZAD&search_scope=default_scope&tab=default_tab&lang=de_DE (Library Catalogue)

Download

Green Open Access

Download PDF  'Living in a naturally fragmented world : from extra-pair paternity in local populations to spatial population structure of the reed bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) across Europe'.
Preview
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB