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Exploring preferences of older adults for dental services: A pilot multi‐national discrete choice experiment


Chebib, Najla; Holmes, Emily; Maniewicz, Sabrina; Abou‐Ayash, Samir; Srinivasan, Murali; McKenna, Gerald; Kossioni, Anastasia; Schimmel, Martin; Müller, Frauke; Brocklehurst, Paul (2023). Exploring preferences of older adults for dental services: A pilot multi‐national discrete choice experiment. Gerodontology:Epub ahead of print.

Abstract

Objectives: To pilot an exploration of older adults' future preferences using discrete choice experiments to understand who should provide dental examinations and treatment, where these services should be provided, and participants' willingness to pay and willingness to travel.BackgroundThe proportion of older adults in the general population is increasing and is recognised as a pressing public health challenge.
Materials and Methods: Older people aged 65 years and over were recruited into this study from the UK, Switzerland and Greece. Drawing on earlier stakeholder engagement, a set of choice experiments are developed to explore the future preferences of older people for dental examinations and dental treatment, as they anticipated losing their independence. These were presented to the participants using a range of platforms, because of the COVID pandemic. Data were analysed in STATA using a random‐effects logit model.
Results: Two hundred and forty‐six participants (median age 70 years) completed the pilot study. There was a strong preference across all countries for a dentist to undertake a dental examination (Greece: β = 0.944, Switzerland: β = 0.260, UK β = 0.791), rather than a medical doctor (Greece: β = −0.556, Switzerland: β = −0.4690, UK: β = −0.468). Participants in Switzerland and the UK preferred these examinations to be undertaken in a dental practice (Switzerland: β = 0.220, UK: β = 0.580) while participants in Greece preferred the dental examination to be undertaken in their homes (β = 1.172). Greek participants preferred dental treatment to be undertaken by a specialist (β = 0.365) in their home (β = 0.862), while participants from the UK and Switzerland preferred to avoid any dental treatment at home (Switzerland: β = −0.387; UK: β = −0.444). Willingness to pay analyses highlighted that participants in Switzerland and the UK were willing to pay more to ensure the continuity of future service provision at a family dental practice (Switzerland: β = 0.454, UK: β = 0.695).
Conclusion: Discrete choice experiments are valuable for exploring older people's preferences for dental service provision in different countries. Future larger studies should be conducted to further explore the potential of this approach, given the pressing need to design services that are fit for purpose for older people. Continuity of dental service provision is considered as important by most older people, as they anticipate losing their dependence.

Abstract

Objectives: To pilot an exploration of older adults' future preferences using discrete choice experiments to understand who should provide dental examinations and treatment, where these services should be provided, and participants' willingness to pay and willingness to travel.BackgroundThe proportion of older adults in the general population is increasing and is recognised as a pressing public health challenge.
Materials and Methods: Older people aged 65 years and over were recruited into this study from the UK, Switzerland and Greece. Drawing on earlier stakeholder engagement, a set of choice experiments are developed to explore the future preferences of older people for dental examinations and dental treatment, as they anticipated losing their independence. These were presented to the participants using a range of platforms, because of the COVID pandemic. Data were analysed in STATA using a random‐effects logit model.
Results: Two hundred and forty‐six participants (median age 70 years) completed the pilot study. There was a strong preference across all countries for a dentist to undertake a dental examination (Greece: β = 0.944, Switzerland: β = 0.260, UK β = 0.791), rather than a medical doctor (Greece: β = −0.556, Switzerland: β = −0.4690, UK: β = −0.468). Participants in Switzerland and the UK preferred these examinations to be undertaken in a dental practice (Switzerland: β = 0.220, UK: β = 0.580) while participants in Greece preferred the dental examination to be undertaken in their homes (β = 1.172). Greek participants preferred dental treatment to be undertaken by a specialist (β = 0.365) in their home (β = 0.862), while participants from the UK and Switzerland preferred to avoid any dental treatment at home (Switzerland: β = −0.387; UK: β = −0.444). Willingness to pay analyses highlighted that participants in Switzerland and the UK were willing to pay more to ensure the continuity of future service provision at a family dental practice (Switzerland: β = 0.454, UK: β = 0.695).
Conclusion: Discrete choice experiments are valuable for exploring older people's preferences for dental service provision in different countries. Future larger studies should be conducted to further explore the potential of this approach, given the pressing need to design services that are fit for purpose for older people. Continuity of dental service provision is considered as important by most older people, as they anticipate losing their dependence.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Klinik für Allgemein-, Behinderten- und Seniorenzahnmedizin
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Health Sciences > Geriatrics and Gerontology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Geriatrics and Gerontology, General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:13 June 2023
Deposited On:29 Dec 2023 09:51
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:45
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0734-0664
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ger.12696
Related URLs: (Publisher)
PubMed ID:37309614
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)