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A meta-analysis and mapping of global mpox infection among children and adolescents


Abstract

Monkeypox (mpox) is a significant health concern affecting children and adolescents globally. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to synthesise the available evidence on the proportion of children and adolescents affected by the mpox virus. A comprehensive search was conducted in seven electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, EMBASE, ProQuest, EBSCOHost, and Cochrane) to identify the original reports on mpox cases in children and adolescents till 15 January 2023. Descriptive reports on probable or laboratory-confirmed mpox in children and adolescents (0-17 years old) were considered eligible. Studies not providing separate data for the above age group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was pooled proportion of mpox cases among children and adolescents. Proportion meta-analysis and heterogeneity between studies were determined using a restricted maximum likelihood estimator, and a random-effects model was fitted to the data. Sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were also conducted. A drapery plot was also provided as a complementary figure to the forest plot. The protocol was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (CRD42023392475). A total of 440 studies were identified, of which 37 were included in the review and 25 in the meta-analysis (62,701 participants with 3306 children and adolescents). The pooled proportion of children and adolescents was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30-0.63, I$^{2}$ :100%). The proportion of children and adolescents was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in the ongoing pandemic 0.04 (95% CI: 0.00-0.32) than before 2022 0.62 (95% CI: 0.49-0.74). The meta-regression showed that the higher the study's sample size, the lower the proportion of children among the mpox cases. Both overall and subgroup heterogeneity were high. Adolescents and children below 5 years are commonly affected by the ongoing pandemic. In conclusion, the high proportion of children affected by the mpox virus highlights the need for increased research and targeted interventions to prevent and control the spread of the virus in this population.

Abstract

Monkeypox (mpox) is a significant health concern affecting children and adolescents globally. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to synthesise the available evidence on the proportion of children and adolescents affected by the mpox virus. A comprehensive search was conducted in seven electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, EMBASE, ProQuest, EBSCOHost, and Cochrane) to identify the original reports on mpox cases in children and adolescents till 15 January 2023. Descriptive reports on probable or laboratory-confirmed mpox in children and adolescents (0-17 years old) were considered eligible. Studies not providing separate data for the above age group and case-control studies were excluded. The primary outcome was pooled proportion of mpox cases among children and adolescents. Proportion meta-analysis and heterogeneity between studies were determined using a restricted maximum likelihood estimator, and a random-effects model was fitted to the data. Sensitivity analysis and subgroup analysis were also conducted. A drapery plot was also provided as a complementary figure to the forest plot. The protocol was prospectively registered with PROSPERO (CRD42023392475). A total of 440 studies were identified, of which 37 were included in the review and 25 in the meta-analysis (62,701 participants with 3306 children and adolescents). The pooled proportion of children and adolescents was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.30-0.63, I$^{2}$ :100%). The proportion of children and adolescents was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in the ongoing pandemic 0.04 (95% CI: 0.00-0.32) than before 2022 0.62 (95% CI: 0.49-0.74). The meta-regression showed that the higher the study's sample size, the lower the proportion of children among the mpox cases. Both overall and subgroup heterogeneity were high. Adolescents and children below 5 years are commonly affected by the ongoing pandemic. In conclusion, the high proportion of children affected by the mpox virus highlights the need for increased research and targeted interventions to prevent and control the spread of the virus in this population.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute (EBPI)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Virology
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Language:English
Date:September 2023
Deposited On:04 Jan 2024 16:29
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1052-9276
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/rmv.2472
PubMed ID:37529964