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Sedentarism in Recreational Marathon Runners


Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Knechtle, Beat (2023). Sedentarism in Recreational Marathon Runners. Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, 14:103-109.

Abstract

AIM

Although it has been previously observed that sedentary behavior (SB) was not related to training duration in marathon runners, little information existed about the relationship of SB with training, anthropometric and physiological characteristics in this population. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of SB and its correlation with performance parameters (such as body fat percentage, maximal oxygen uptake and weekly training volume) as well as its variation by sex and day (ie, weekdays versus weekend) in recreational marathon runners.

METHODS

A total of 151 finishers (women, n = 29; men, n = 122; age 43.1 (8.7) years, mean (standard deviation)) in the Athens marathon 2017 performed a series of anthropometric and physiological tests, and completed the Multi-context sitting time questionnaire.

RESULTS

SB did not correlate with anthropometric and physiological characteristics and no difference in these characteristics was shown between low and high sedentary participants (p > 0.05). SB did not differ between women and men (p > 0.05), but differed between working and non-working days (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

In contrast to previous findings on the general population indicating an association of a high SB with a low cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, our finding of no correlation between SB and physical fitness in marathon runners suggested that endurance exercise might offset the negative effects of SB.

Abstract

AIM

Although it has been previously observed that sedentary behavior (SB) was not related to training duration in marathon runners, little information existed about the relationship of SB with training, anthropometric and physiological characteristics in this population. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of SB and its correlation with performance parameters (such as body fat percentage, maximal oxygen uptake and weekly training volume) as well as its variation by sex and day (ie, weekdays versus weekend) in recreational marathon runners.

METHODS

A total of 151 finishers (women, n = 29; men, n = 122; age 43.1 (8.7) years, mean (standard deviation)) in the Athens marathon 2017 performed a series of anthropometric and physiological tests, and completed the Multi-context sitting time questionnaire.

RESULTS

SB did not correlate with anthropometric and physiological characteristics and no difference in these characteristics was shown between low and high sedentary participants (p > 0.05). SB did not differ between women and men (p > 0.05), but differed between working and non-working days (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

In contrast to previous findings on the general population indicating an association of a high SB with a low cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, our finding of no correlation between SB and physical fitness in marathon runners suggested that endurance exercise might offset the negative effects of SB.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of General Practice
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
Health Sciences > Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Health Sciences > Podiatry
Health Sciences > Complementary and Manual Therapy
Health Sciences > Occupational Therapy
Health Sciences > Optometry
Language:English
Date:28 December 2023
Deposited On:09 Jan 2024 13:55
Last Modified:31 May 2024 01:47
Publisher:Dove Medical Press Ltd.
ISSN:1179-1543
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.2147/OAJSM.S444862
PubMed ID:38164226
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)