Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Masking capacity of minimally invasive lithium disilicate restorations on discolored teeth—The impact of ceramic thickness, the material's translucency, and the cement color


Pala, Kevser; Reinshagen, Eva Maria; Attin, Thomas; Hüsler, Jürg; Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis (2024). Masking capacity of minimally invasive lithium disilicate restorations on discolored teeth—The impact of ceramic thickness, the material's translucency, and the cement color. Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry, 36(1):107-115.

Abstract

Objectives
To evaluate minimally invasive restorations' capacity to mask discolored teeth and explore the impact of ceramic thickness, translucency, and cement color.

Materials and Methods
Twenty‐four assessment pairs of naturally colored and discolored bovine dentin samples were formed, using lithium disilicate specimens in six different thicknesses (0.3–0.8 mm), two different translucencies (high, low), and two cements (transparent, tooth‐colored). Evaluators assessed the color differences in each assessment pair, and the threshold for detecting a color difference was determined using sequential testing and the Bonferroni‐Holm method.

Results
A thickness of 0.6 mm effectively masked color differences using high translucent ceramic with transparent cement, detectable differences were still observed at 0.7/0.8 mm. A threshold thickness of 0.4 mm was seen using high translucent ceramic and tooth‐colored cement, with color differences still discernible at 0.5 and 0.8 mm. A threshold thickness of 0.4 mm was detected using low translucent ceramic and transparent cement, while detectable differences persisted at 0.5, 0.7, and 0.8 mm. A 0.5 mm threshold thickness was observed when using low translucent ceramic and tooth‐colored cement, and no detectable color differences were detected beyond this thickness.

Conclusions
Masking can be achieved with a thickness of 0.4–0.5 mm using a low translucent material and tooth‐colored cement.

Clinical Significance
Understanding the impact of ceramic thickness, translucency, and cement color can aid clinicians in making informed decisions for achieving the best esthetic outcomes while preserving tooth structure. Effective masking can be accomplished with ceramic thicknesses starting at 0.4 mm, especially when employing a low translucent material and tooth‐colored cement. However, clinicians should be aware that discolorations may still be detectable in certain scenarios when using minimally invasive lithium disilicate restorations.

Abstract

Objectives
To evaluate minimally invasive restorations' capacity to mask discolored teeth and explore the impact of ceramic thickness, translucency, and cement color.

Materials and Methods
Twenty‐four assessment pairs of naturally colored and discolored bovine dentin samples were formed, using lithium disilicate specimens in six different thicknesses (0.3–0.8 mm), two different translucencies (high, low), and two cements (transparent, tooth‐colored). Evaluators assessed the color differences in each assessment pair, and the threshold for detecting a color difference was determined using sequential testing and the Bonferroni‐Holm method.

Results
A thickness of 0.6 mm effectively masked color differences using high translucent ceramic with transparent cement, detectable differences were still observed at 0.7/0.8 mm. A threshold thickness of 0.4 mm was seen using high translucent ceramic and tooth‐colored cement, with color differences still discernible at 0.5 and 0.8 mm. A threshold thickness of 0.4 mm was detected using low translucent ceramic and transparent cement, while detectable differences persisted at 0.5, 0.7, and 0.8 mm. A 0.5 mm threshold thickness was observed when using low translucent ceramic and tooth‐colored cement, and no detectable color differences were detected beyond this thickness.

Conclusions
Masking can be achieved with a thickness of 0.4–0.5 mm using a low translucent material and tooth‐colored cement.

Clinical Significance
Understanding the impact of ceramic thickness, translucency, and cement color can aid clinicians in making informed decisions for achieving the best esthetic outcomes while preserving tooth structure. Effective masking can be accomplished with ceramic thicknesses starting at 0.4 mm, especially when employing a low translucent material and tooth‐colored cement. However, clinicians should be aware that discolorations may still be detectable in certain scenarios when using minimally invasive lithium disilicate restorations.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 10 Jan 2024
3 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Uncontrolled Keywords:General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:1 January 2024
Deposited On:10 Jan 2024 16:30
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:46
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1496-4155
Additional Information:This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Pala, Kevser; Reinshagen, Eva Maria; Attin, Thomas; Hüsler, Jürg; Jung, Ronald E; Ioannidis, Alexis (2023). Masking capacity of minimally invasive lithium disilicate restorations on discolored teeth—The impact of ceramic thickness, the material's translucency, and the cement color. Journal of Esthetic and Restorative Dentistry:Online ahead of print, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/ 10.1111/jerd.13146. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. (http://www.wileyauthors.com/self-archiving)
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jerd.13146
PubMed ID:37933738
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)