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Long-term quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) trajectories in persons with and without HBsAg loss on tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy


Begré, Lorin; Boyd, Anders; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Suter-Riniker, Franziska; Béguelin, Charles; Rockstroh, Jürgen K; Günthard, Huldrych F; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Stöckle, Marcel; Schmid, Patrick; Bernasconi, Enos; Levrero, Massimo; Zoulim, Fabien; Wandeler, Gilles; Rauch, Andri; Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) (2024). Long-term quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) trajectories in persons with and without HBsAg loss on tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy. HIV Medicine, 25(2):291-298.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Improving the understanding of the patterns of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) trajectories associated with HBsAg loss is important in light of novel anti-hepatitis B virus agents being developed. We evaluated long-term qHBsAg trajectories in persons with HIV and HBV during tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

METHODS

We included 29 participants with and 29 without HBsAg loss, defined as qHBsAg <0.05 IU/mL. We assessed qHBsAg decline during therapy in both groups and used agglomerative hierarchical clustering to identify different qHBsAg trajectory profiles in persons with HBsAg loss.

RESULTS

The median follow-up time was 11.9 years (IQR 8.4-14.1), and the median time to HBsAg loss was 48 months (IQR 12-96). Among participants with HBsAg loss, 79% had a qHBsAg decline ≥1 log$_{10}$ IU/mL 2 years after starting tenofovir. The trajectories in qHBsAg levels during tenofovir therapy were heterogeneous, characterized by five distinct profiles. Among participants without HBsAg loss, only 7% had a qHBsAg decline ≥1 log$_{10}$ IU/ml after 2 years.

CONCLUSIONS

Most persons with HIV who experienced HBsAg loss had an early decline in qHBsAg levels, with diverse trajectories during long-term tenofovir therapy. In persons without HBsAg loss, qHBsAg levels remained remarkably stable over time.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Improving the understanding of the patterns of quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) trajectories associated with HBsAg loss is important in light of novel anti-hepatitis B virus agents being developed. We evaluated long-term qHBsAg trajectories in persons with HIV and HBV during tenofovir-containing antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

METHODS

We included 29 participants with and 29 without HBsAg loss, defined as qHBsAg <0.05 IU/mL. We assessed qHBsAg decline during therapy in both groups and used agglomerative hierarchical clustering to identify different qHBsAg trajectory profiles in persons with HBsAg loss.

RESULTS

The median follow-up time was 11.9 years (IQR 8.4-14.1), and the median time to HBsAg loss was 48 months (IQR 12-96). Among participants with HBsAg loss, 79% had a qHBsAg decline ≥1 log$_{10}$ IU/mL 2 years after starting tenofovir. The trajectories in qHBsAg levels during tenofovir therapy were heterogeneous, characterized by five distinct profiles. Among participants without HBsAg loss, only 7% had a qHBsAg decline ≥1 log$_{10}$ IU/ml after 2 years.

CONCLUSIONS

Most persons with HIV who experienced HBsAg loss had an early decline in qHBsAg levels, with diverse trajectories during long-term tenofovir therapy. In persons without HBsAg loss, qHBsAg levels remained remarkably stable over time.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Health Policy
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Health Sciences > Pharmacology (medical)
Language:English
Date:February 2024
Deposited On:15 Jan 2024 11:49
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1464-2662
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/hiv.13561
PubMed ID:37816492
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)