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Vaccinating people living with HIV: a fast track to preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines


Trkola, Alexandra; Moore, Penny L (2024). Vaccinating people living with HIV: a fast track to preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines. Lancet Infectious Diseases, 24(4):e252-e255.

Abstract

Globally, the number of new HIV infections remains unacceptably high, and urgent new approaches are needed to advance HIV vaccine science. However, the development of a preventive HIV vaccine has proven to be an intractable scientific challenge. Recent advances in HIV immunogen design have taken the field a step closer to triggering the rare precursors of broadly neutralising antibodies, which are widely assumed to be necessary for a vaccine. Nonetheless, these same studies and previous studies in people living with HIV have also highlighted the major hurdles that must be overcome to boost the cross-reactivity and potency of these responses to sufficient levels. Here, we describe an opportunity for fast-tracking the evaluation of candidate preventive and therapeutic vaccines by immunising people with HIV who are antiretroviral therapy suppressed. We argue that such studies, unlike traditional studies of vaccines in participants not infected with HIV, will be faster and more informative and will allow the vaccine field to bypass multiple hurdles. This approach will accelerate the process of defining the capacity of immunogens to trigger relevant antibodies, currently an extremely slow and expensive pathway, and provide a quick path to creating an HIV vaccine.

Abstract

Globally, the number of new HIV infections remains unacceptably high, and urgent new approaches are needed to advance HIV vaccine science. However, the development of a preventive HIV vaccine has proven to be an intractable scientific challenge. Recent advances in HIV immunogen design have taken the field a step closer to triggering the rare precursors of broadly neutralising antibodies, which are widely assumed to be necessary for a vaccine. Nonetheless, these same studies and previous studies in people living with HIV have also highlighted the major hurdles that must be overcome to boost the cross-reactivity and potency of these responses to sufficient levels. Here, we describe an opportunity for fast-tracking the evaluation of candidate preventive and therapeutic vaccines by immunising people with HIV who are antiretroviral therapy suppressed. We argue that such studies, unlike traditional studies of vaccines in participants not infected with HIV, will be faster and more informative and will allow the vaccine field to bypass multiple hurdles. This approach will accelerate the process of defining the capacity of immunogens to trigger relevant antibodies, currently an extremely slow and expensive pathway, and provide a quick path to creating an HIV vaccine.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 April 2024
Deposited On:15 Jan 2024 14:57
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1473-3099
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(23)00481-4
PubMed ID:37883985