Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Backlash or Progressive Mobilization? Voter Reactions to Perceived Trajectories of Women’s Representation


Breyer, Magdalena (2024). Backlash or Progressive Mobilization? Voter Reactions to Perceived Trajectories of Women’s Representation. Comparative Political Studies:1-32.

Abstract

Existing research on the effects of women’s descriptive representation on citizens’ attitudes has mainly investigated potential positive effects, namely on political engagement or the legitimacy of outcomes. However, trends in representation have rarely been theorized as potential causes of resentment among women. While a male backlash to increasing representation has been theorized, this article argues that women may also be discontent with their trajectory of representation, if they perceive it as stagnating. Using a survey experiment fielded in Germany, the results show that a stagnating representation trajectory mobilizes women to vote for a progressive party, the German Greens. In contrast, the paper demonstrates that men do not lash back against women’s increasing representation, even if they realize that this means a lower standing for themselves. This article contributes to research on political behavior by highlighting that discontent with persisting inequality is a mobilizing factor for progressive parties.

Abstract

Existing research on the effects of women’s descriptive representation on citizens’ attitudes has mainly investigated potential positive effects, namely on political engagement or the legitimacy of outcomes. However, trends in representation have rarely been theorized as potential causes of resentment among women. While a male backlash to increasing representation has been theorized, this article argues that women may also be discontent with their trajectory of representation, if they perceive it as stagnating. Using a survey experiment fielded in Germany, the results show that a stagnating representation trajectory mobilizes women to vote for a progressive party, the German Greens. In contrast, the paper demonstrates that men do not lash back against women’s increasing representation, even if they realize that this means a lower standing for themselves. This article contributes to research on political behavior by highlighting that discontent with persisting inequality is a mobilizing factor for progressive parties.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 16 Jan 2024
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:gender, representation, voting behavior, public opinion, European politics, experimental research
Language:English
Date:13 January 2024
Deposited On:16 Jan 2024 11:45
Last Modified:31 Mar 2024 01:37
Publisher:Sage Publications
ISSN:0010-4140
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/00104140231223745
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID185204
  • : Project TitleSocial Status and the Transformation of Electoral Behavior in Western Europe
  • : FunderUniversity of Zurich
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project TitleResearch Priority Program ‘Equality of Opportunity’
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)