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Associations of actigraphy‐assessed sleep variables with adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes in emerging adults


McNeil, Jessica; Berry, Nathaniel T; Dollar, Jessica M; Shriver, Lenka H; Keane, Susan P; Shanahan, Lilly; Wideman, Laurie (2024). Associations of actigraphy‐assessed sleep variables with adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes in emerging adults. Journal of Sleep Research, 33(2):1-11.

Abstract

SummaryThis study assessed associations of actigraphy‐assessed sleep with adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes in emerging adults, and whether sex and race modified these associations. Data on 147 emerging adults (age = 19.4 ± 1.3 years; body mass index = 26.4 ± 7.0 kg m$^{−2}$; 59% female; 65% White) from RIGHT Track Health were used. Actigraphy‐based sleep measures included sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep timing midpoint, day‐to‐day sleep duration and sleep timing midpoint variability. Combined sleep duration and sleep timing behaviours were also derived (early‐bed/late‐rise, early‐bed/early‐rise, late‐bed/late‐rise, late‐bed/early‐rise). Outcomes included body mass index and BodPod‐assessed fat mass index, fasting serum leptin, C‐reactive protein, and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance. Sleep duration was 5.4 h per night. We noted an inverse association between sleep duration and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance. The early‐bed/early‐rise group had greater body mass index, C‐reactive protein and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance compared with the early‐bed/late‐rise group (referent). Sex modified associations of sleep efficiency with C‐reactive protein; stratified results revealed positive association between sleep efficiency and C‐reactive protein in males, but not females. Race modified associations of sleep duration with body mass index and leptin, and of sleep duration variability with C‐reactive protein. Stratified analyses revealed inverse associations between sleep duration with body mass index and leptin in Black, multiracial/other race individuals only. Positive association between sleep duration variability and C‐reactive protein was noted in White individuals only. Shorter sleep duration, particularly when combined with earlier sleep timing, is associated with greater adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes. Additional studies are needed to assess individual‐ and contextual‐level factors that may contribute to sex and race differences in sleep health and cardiometabolic risk in emerging adults.

Abstract

SummaryThis study assessed associations of actigraphy‐assessed sleep with adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes in emerging adults, and whether sex and race modified these associations. Data on 147 emerging adults (age = 19.4 ± 1.3 years; body mass index = 26.4 ± 7.0 kg m$^{−2}$; 59% female; 65% White) from RIGHT Track Health were used. Actigraphy‐based sleep measures included sleep duration, sleep efficiency, sleep timing midpoint, day‐to‐day sleep duration and sleep timing midpoint variability. Combined sleep duration and sleep timing behaviours were also derived (early‐bed/late‐rise, early‐bed/early‐rise, late‐bed/late‐rise, late‐bed/early‐rise). Outcomes included body mass index and BodPod‐assessed fat mass index, fasting serum leptin, C‐reactive protein, and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance. Sleep duration was 5.4 h per night. We noted an inverse association between sleep duration and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance. The early‐bed/early‐rise group had greater body mass index, C‐reactive protein and homeostatic model assessment‐insulin resistance compared with the early‐bed/late‐rise group (referent). Sex modified associations of sleep efficiency with C‐reactive protein; stratified results revealed positive association between sleep efficiency and C‐reactive protein in males, but not females. Race modified associations of sleep duration with body mass index and leptin, and of sleep duration variability with C‐reactive protein. Stratified analyses revealed inverse associations between sleep duration with body mass index and leptin in Black, multiracial/other race individuals only. Positive association between sleep duration variability and C‐reactive protein was noted in White individuals only. Shorter sleep duration, particularly when combined with earlier sleep timing, is associated with greater adiposity and serum cardiometabolic outcomes. Additional studies are needed to assess individual‐ and contextual‐level factors that may contribute to sex and race differences in sleep health and cardiometabolic risk in emerging adults.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Life Sciences > Behavioral Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:adiposity, cardiometabolic health, emerging adulthood, sleep
Language:English
Date:1 April 2024
Deposited On:17 Jan 2024 16:56
Last Modified:13 May 2024 15:55
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:0962-1105
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jsr.14068
PubMed ID:37803814
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0)