Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Large Area Picosecond Photodetector for the Upgrade II of the LHCb RICH


LHCb Collaboration; Bernet, R; Müller, K; Owen, P; Serra, N; Steinkamp, O; et al (2023). Large Area Picosecond Photodetector for the Upgrade II of the LHCb RICH. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, 1057:168658.

Abstract

The Large Area Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD) is a new generation microchannel plate (MCP) photodetector that is currently capturing the attention of detector physicists thanks to its excellent timing resolution, high gain and low dark count rate. It consists of a photocathode that responds to a single photon by producing a photoelectron that enters a pair of microchannel plates, where it is multiplied to a million electrons in a fast-rising pulse that is easily detected. The speed of this process provides the time resolution essential for high intensity environments such as the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory. The LAPPD has a large sensitive area, 200 × 200 mm$^{2}$ , which reduces the number of sensors that are needed. The increased particle collision rate in the future LHC-HL phase represents a great challenge for the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) photodetectors in the LHCb experiment. The LHCb collaboration is working for the Upgrade II that will take place during the Long Shutdown 4 of the LHC (>2032). The LAPPD produced and commercialised by INCOM (US) represents one of the possible alternatives for the future RICH photodetectors, thanks to its good time resolution, low dark noise rate and high gain. The LHCb Edinburgh group is involved in the Upgrade II R&D programme, testing and characterising an LAPPD in the laboratory of the University. The LAPPD technology, the current Edinburgh setup and performance from first tests of the photodetector will be presented.

Abstract

The Large Area Picosecond Photodetector (LAPPD) is a new generation microchannel plate (MCP) photodetector that is currently capturing the attention of detector physicists thanks to its excellent timing resolution, high gain and low dark count rate. It consists of a photocathode that responds to a single photon by producing a photoelectron that enters a pair of microchannel plates, where it is multiplied to a million electrons in a fast-rising pulse that is easily detected. The speed of this process provides the time resolution essential for high intensity environments such as the high luminosity Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the CERN laboratory. The LAPPD has a large sensitive area, 200 × 200 mm$^{2}$ , which reduces the number of sensors that are needed. The increased particle collision rate in the future LHC-HL phase represents a great challenge for the Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) photodetectors in the LHCb experiment. The LHCb collaboration is working for the Upgrade II that will take place during the Long Shutdown 4 of the LHC (>2032). The LAPPD produced and commercialised by INCOM (US) represents one of the possible alternatives for the future RICH photodetectors, thanks to its good time resolution, low dark noise rate and high gain. The LHCb Edinburgh group is involved in the Upgrade II R&D programme, testing and characterising an LAPPD in the laboratory of the University. The LAPPD technology, the current Edinburgh setup and performance from first tests of the photodetector will be presented.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 13 Feb 2024
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Physics Institute
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Nuclear and High Energy Physics
Physical Sciences > Instrumentation
Language:English
Date:2023
Deposited On:13 Feb 2024 15:21
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:37
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0168-9002
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2023.168658