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Gravity’s Influence on Human Motivation


Schoss, Stephanie; Ullrich, Oliver; Clervoy, Jean-François; Scheffer, David (2023). Gravity’s Influence on Human Motivation. Aerospace, 10(10):848.

Abstract

Earth’s mass generates a definitive Earth-vertical reference, shaping life’s evolution. Notably, these gravity models influence self-perception and the first-person viewpoint in the CNS, tied to bodily self-awareness and spatial orientation. Transitioning from Earth’s constant gravity to microgravity potentially disrupts the CNS’s gravity-representation models, formed since birth. Our study explored if altered gravity triggers emotional and motivational responses in rapid CNS adaptations. A psychological parallel between Earth’s gravity and attachment systems in infants and adults is proposed. We measured implicit motives through vocal interactions during demanding tasks, finding that disrupted gravity impacts the implicit affiliation motive, i.e., the subconscious need to restore bonding as soon there are signals that this attachment or “gravitational” field is disrupted. As expected, this implicit need for attachment was significantly higher in the groups which experienced disrupted gravity. Causation remains unverifiable due to exploratory design.

Abstract

Earth’s mass generates a definitive Earth-vertical reference, shaping life’s evolution. Notably, these gravity models influence self-perception and the first-person viewpoint in the CNS, tied to bodily self-awareness and spatial orientation. Transitioning from Earth’s constant gravity to microgravity potentially disrupts the CNS’s gravity-representation models, formed since birth. Our study explored if altered gravity triggers emotional and motivational responses in rapid CNS adaptations. A psychological parallel between Earth’s gravity and attachment systems in infants and adults is proposed. We measured implicit motives through vocal interactions during demanding tasks, finding that disrupted gravity impacts the implicit affiliation motive, i.e., the subconscious need to restore bonding as soon there are signals that this attachment or “gravitational” field is disrupted. As expected, this implicit need for attachment was significantly higher in the groups which experienced disrupted gravity. Causation remains unverifiable due to exploratory design.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Pneumology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Aerospace Engineering
Uncontrolled Keywords:Aerospace Engineering
Language:English
Date:28 September 2023
Deposited On:18 Jan 2024 16:09
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:47
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2226-4310
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10100848
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)