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Pre- and post-task resting-state differs in clinical populations


Lor, Cindy Sumaly; Zhang, Mengfan; Karner, Alexander; Steyrl, David; Sladky, Ronald; Scharnowski, Frank; Haugg, Amelie (2023). Pre- and post-task resting-state differs in clinical populations. NeuroImage: Clinical, 37:103345.

Abstract

Resting-state functional connectivity has generated great hopes as a potential brain biomarker for improving prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in psychiatry. This neuroimaging protocol can routinely be performed by patients and does not depend on the specificities of a task. Thus, it seems ideal for big data approaches that require aggregating data across multiple studies and sites. However, technical variability, diverging data analysis approaches, and differences in data acquisition protocols introduce heterogeneity to the aggregated data. Besides these technical aspects, a prior task that changes the psychological state of participants might also contribute to heterogeneity. In healthy participants, studies have shown that behavioral tasks can influence resting-state measures, but such effects have not yet been reported in clinical populations. Here, we fill this knowledge gap by comparing resting-state functional connectivity before and after clinically relevant tasks in two clinical conditions, namely substance use disorders and phobias. The tasks consisted of viewing craving-inducing and spider anxiety provoking pictures that are frequently used in cue-reactivity studies and exposure therapy. We found distinct pre- vs post-task resting-state connectivity differences in each group, as well as decreased thalamo-cortical and increased intra-thalamic connectivity which might be associated with decreased vigilance in both groups. Our results confirm that resting-state measures can be strongly influenced by prior emotion-inducing tasks that need to be taken into account when pooling resting-state scans for clinical biomarker detection. This demands that resting-state datasets should include a complete description of the experimental design, especially when a task preceded data collection.

Abstract

Resting-state functional connectivity has generated great hopes as a potential brain biomarker for improving prevention, diagnosis, and treatment in psychiatry. This neuroimaging protocol can routinely be performed by patients and does not depend on the specificities of a task. Thus, it seems ideal for big data approaches that require aggregating data across multiple studies and sites. However, technical variability, diverging data analysis approaches, and differences in data acquisition protocols introduce heterogeneity to the aggregated data. Besides these technical aspects, a prior task that changes the psychological state of participants might also contribute to heterogeneity. In healthy participants, studies have shown that behavioral tasks can influence resting-state measures, but such effects have not yet been reported in clinical populations. Here, we fill this knowledge gap by comparing resting-state functional connectivity before and after clinically relevant tasks in two clinical conditions, namely substance use disorders and phobias. The tasks consisted of viewing craving-inducing and spider anxiety provoking pictures that are frequently used in cue-reactivity studies and exposure therapy. We found distinct pre- vs post-task resting-state connectivity differences in each group, as well as decreased thalamo-cortical and increased intra-thalamic connectivity which might be associated with decreased vigilance in both groups. Our results confirm that resting-state measures can be strongly influenced by prior emotion-inducing tasks that need to be taken into account when pooling resting-state scans for clinical biomarker detection. This demands that resting-state datasets should include a complete description of the experimental design, especially when a task preceded data collection.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Imaging
Life Sciences > Neurology
Health Sciences > Neurology (clinical)
Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Clinical biomarkers; Functional connectivity; Nicotine addiction; Pre-post changes; Resting-state; Specific phobia
Language:English
Date:1 January 2023
Deposited On:23 Jan 2024 11:38
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:48
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2213-1582
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nicl.2023.103345
PubMed ID:36780835
Project Information:
  • : FunderUniversität Zürich
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderBaugarten Stiftung
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)