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In vitro evaluation of different protective techniques to reduce titanium particle contamination during implantoplasty


Platt, A; Liu, C C; Gubler, A; Naenni, Nadja; Thoma, D; Schmidlin, P R (2023). In vitro evaluation of different protective techniques to reduce titanium particle contamination during implantoplasty. Clinical Oral Investigations, 27(8):4205-4213.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
Our aim is to study titanium remains in a bone model during standardized implantoplasty under different isolation and protective modalities.

MATERIAL AND METHODS
Forty implants were placed in artificial spongy bone blocks mimicking a horizontal bone loss and implant neck protrusion of 5 mm. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10), which were treated as follows: rubber dam (A), a dental adhesive paste (B), bone wax (C), and an unprotected positive control (D). Implantoplasty was performed using carbide and diamond burs under strict water cooling and standardized suction. After removal of the respective isolation materials, the bone blocks were thoroughly rinsed with tap water for 3 min and titanium chips were collected using a filter integrated in the model. The filter paper was removed and dissolved in 37% hydrochloric acid for 2 h at 120 °C and the titanium remnants were quantified using atomic absorption spectrometry.

RESULTS
None of the test groups were able to completely prevent titanium particle contamination. Rubber dam (691 ± 249 µg) and bone wax (516 ± 157 µg) were found to be significantly more protective than the positive control (2313 ± 747 µg) (p < 0.001) with respect to the amount of titanium particles that remained in the bone model after implantoplasty. The adhesive paste group (1863.5 ± 538 µg) was not significantly different from the positive control (p = 0.19).

CONCLUSIONS
Despite some limitations of the present study, titanium particles resulting from a standardized implantoplasty can be assumed to be significantly reduced when the tissues/bone were protected with rubber dam and bone wax, or a combination, depending on individual accessibility.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE
Tissue protective measures to reduce or avoid particle contamination during implantoplasty is possible and should be considered and further clinically assessed to avoid iatrogenic inflammatory reactions.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
Our aim is to study titanium remains in a bone model during standardized implantoplasty under different isolation and protective modalities.

MATERIAL AND METHODS
Forty implants were placed in artificial spongy bone blocks mimicking a horizontal bone loss and implant neck protrusion of 5 mm. Samples were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10), which were treated as follows: rubber dam (A), a dental adhesive paste (B), bone wax (C), and an unprotected positive control (D). Implantoplasty was performed using carbide and diamond burs under strict water cooling and standardized suction. After removal of the respective isolation materials, the bone blocks were thoroughly rinsed with tap water for 3 min and titanium chips were collected using a filter integrated in the model. The filter paper was removed and dissolved in 37% hydrochloric acid for 2 h at 120 °C and the titanium remnants were quantified using atomic absorption spectrometry.

RESULTS
None of the test groups were able to completely prevent titanium particle contamination. Rubber dam (691 ± 249 µg) and bone wax (516 ± 157 µg) were found to be significantly more protective than the positive control (2313 ± 747 µg) (p < 0.001) with respect to the amount of titanium particles that remained in the bone model after implantoplasty. The adhesive paste group (1863.5 ± 538 µg) was not significantly different from the positive control (p = 0.19).

CONCLUSIONS
Despite some limitations of the present study, titanium particles resulting from a standardized implantoplasty can be assumed to be significantly reduced when the tissues/bone were protected with rubber dam and bone wax, or a combination, depending on individual accessibility.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE
Tissue protective measures to reduce or avoid particle contamination during implantoplasty is possible and should be considered and further clinically assessed to avoid iatrogenic inflammatory reactions.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Conservative and Preventive Dentistry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic of Reconstructive Dentistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Dentistry
Language:English
Date:August 2023
Deposited On:05 Feb 2024 13:38
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:49
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1432-6981
OA Status:Hybrid
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00784-023-05037-8
PubMed ID:37140763
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)