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From mother to child: How intergenerational transfer is reflected in similarity of corticolimbic brain structure and mental health


Dimanova, Plamina; Borbas, Réka; Raschle, Nora Maria (2023). From mother to child: How intergenerational transfer is reflected in similarity of corticolimbic brain structure and mental health. Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience, 64:101324.

Abstract

Background
Intergenerational transfer effects include traits transmission from parent to child. While behaviorally well documented, studies on intergenerational transfer effects for brain structure or functioning are scarce, especially those examining relations of behavioral and neurobiological endophenotypes. This study aims to investigate behavioral and neural intergenerational transfer effects associated with the corticolimbic circuitry, relevant for socioemotional functioning and mental well-being.

Methods
T1-neuroimaging and behavioral data was obtained from 72 participants (39 mother-child dyads/ 39 children; 7–13 years; 16 girls/ 33 mothers; 26–52 years). Gray matter volume (GMV) was extracted from corticolimbic regions (subcortical: amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens; neocortical: anterior cingulate, medial orbitofrontal areas). Mother-child similarity was quantified by correlation coefficients and comparisons to random adult-child pairs.

Results
We identified significant corticolimbic mother-child similarity (r = 0.663) stronger for subcortical over neocortical regions. Mother-child similarity in mental well-being was significant (r = 0.409) and the degree of dyadic similarity in mental well-being was predicted by similarity in neocortical, but not subcortical GMV.

Conclusion
Intergenerational neuroimaging reveals significant mother-child transfer for corticolimbic GMV, most strongly for subcortical regions. However, variations in neocortical similarity predicted similarity in mother-child well-being. Ultimately, such techniques may enhance our knowledge of behavioral and neural familial transfer effects relevant for health and disease.

Abstract

Background
Intergenerational transfer effects include traits transmission from parent to child. While behaviorally well documented, studies on intergenerational transfer effects for brain structure or functioning are scarce, especially those examining relations of behavioral and neurobiological endophenotypes. This study aims to investigate behavioral and neural intergenerational transfer effects associated with the corticolimbic circuitry, relevant for socioemotional functioning and mental well-being.

Methods
T1-neuroimaging and behavioral data was obtained from 72 participants (39 mother-child dyads/ 39 children; 7–13 years; 16 girls/ 33 mothers; 26–52 years). Gray matter volume (GMV) was extracted from corticolimbic regions (subcortical: amygdala, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens; neocortical: anterior cingulate, medial orbitofrontal areas). Mother-child similarity was quantified by correlation coefficients and comparisons to random adult-child pairs.

Results
We identified significant corticolimbic mother-child similarity (r = 0.663) stronger for subcortical over neocortical regions. Mother-child similarity in mental well-being was significant (r = 0.409) and the degree of dyadic similarity in mental well-being was predicted by similarity in neocortical, but not subcortical GMV.

Conclusion
Intergenerational neuroimaging reveals significant mother-child transfer for corticolimbic GMV, most strongly for subcortical regions. However, variations in neocortical similarity predicted similarity in mother-child well-being. Ultimately, such techniques may enhance our knowledge of behavioral and neural familial transfer effects relevant for health and disease.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
06 Faculty of Arts > Jacobs Center for Productive Youth Development
Dewey Decimal Classification:370 Education
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Cognitive Neuroscience
Uncontrolled Keywords:Intergenerational neuroimaging, MRI, Brain morphology, Corticolimbic circuitry, Development, Mental well-being
Language:English
Date:1 December 2023
Deposited On:06 Feb 2024 17:30
Last Modified:06 May 2024 10:30
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1878-9293
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dcn.2023.101324
PubMed ID:37979300
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)