Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The skin mycobiome and intermicrobial interactions in the cutaneous niche


Tuor, Meret; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé (2023). The skin mycobiome and intermicrobial interactions in the cutaneous niche. Current Opinion in Microbiology, 76:102381.

Abstract

Mammalian microbiomes have coevolved with their host to establish a stable homeostatic relationship. Multifaceted commensal-host and commensal-commensal interactions contribute to the maintenance of the equilibrium with an impact on diverse host physiological processes. Despite constant exposure to physical and chemical insults from the environment, the skin harbors a surprisingly stable microbiome. The fungal compartment of the skin microbiome, the skin mycobiome, is unique in that it is dominated by a single fungus, Malassezia. The lack in diversity suggests that the skin may provide a unique niche for this fungal genus and that Malassezia may efficiently outcompete other fungi from the skin. This opinion article examines aspects in support of this hypothesis, discusses how changes in niche conditions associate with skin mycobiome dysregulation, and highlights an emerging example of Malassezia being displaced from the skin by the emerging fungal pathogen C. auris, thereby generating a predisposing situation for fatal-invasive infection.

Abstract

Mammalian microbiomes have coevolved with their host to establish a stable homeostatic relationship. Multifaceted commensal-host and commensal-commensal interactions contribute to the maintenance of the equilibrium with an impact on diverse host physiological processes. Despite constant exposure to physical and chemical insults from the environment, the skin harbors a surprisingly stable microbiome. The fungal compartment of the skin microbiome, the skin mycobiome, is unique in that it is dominated by a single fungus, Malassezia. The lack in diversity suggests that the skin may provide a unique niche for this fungal genus and that Malassezia may efficiently outcompete other fungi from the skin. This opinion article examines aspects in support of this hypothesis, discusses how changes in niche conditions associate with skin mycobiome dysregulation, and highlights an emerging example of Malassezia being displaced from the skin by the emerging fungal pathogen C. auris, thereby generating a predisposing situation for fatal-invasive infection.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

6 downloads since deposited on 06 Feb 2024
7 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Immunology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Experimental Immunology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Health Sciences > Microbiology (medical)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Uncontrolled Keywords:Infectious Diseases, Microbiology (medical), Microbiology
Language:English
Date:1 December 2023
Deposited On:06 Feb 2024 17:45
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:38
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1369-5274
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mib.2023.102381
PubMed ID:37703811
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)