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A Review of Neural Data and Modelling to Explain How a Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SCD) Causes Enhanced VEMPs, Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus (SVIN), and the Tullio Phenomenon


Curthoys, Ian S; Smith, Christopher M; Burgess, Ann M; Dlugaiczyk, Julia (2023). A Review of Neural Data and Modelling to Explain How a Semicircular Canal Dehiscence (SCD) Causes Enhanced VEMPs, Skull Vibration Induced Nystagmus (SVIN), and the Tullio Phenomenon. Audiology Research, 13(3):418-430.

Abstract

Angular acceleration stimulation of a semicircular canal causes an increased firing rate in primary canal afferent neurons that result in nystagmus in healthy adult animals. However, increased firing rate in canal afferent neurons can also be caused by sound or vibration in patients after a semicircular canal dehiscence, and so these unusual stimuli will also cause nystagmus. The recent data and model by Iversen and Rabbitt show that sound or vibration may increase firing rate either by neural activation locked to the individual cycles of the stimulus or by slow changes in firing rate due to fluid pumping (“acoustic streaming”), which causes cupula deflection. Both mechanisms will act to increase the primary afferent firing rate and so trigger nystagmus. The primary afferent data in guinea pigs indicate that in some situations, these two mechanisms may oppose each other. This review has shown how these three clinical phenomena—skull vibration-induced nystagmus, enhanced vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and the Tullio phenomenon—have a common tie: they are caused by the new response of semicircular canal afferent neurons to sound and vibration after a semicircular canal dehiscence.

Abstract

Angular acceleration stimulation of a semicircular canal causes an increased firing rate in primary canal afferent neurons that result in nystagmus in healthy adult animals. However, increased firing rate in canal afferent neurons can also be caused by sound or vibration in patients after a semicircular canal dehiscence, and so these unusual stimuli will also cause nystagmus. The recent data and model by Iversen and Rabbitt show that sound or vibration may increase firing rate either by neural activation locked to the individual cycles of the stimulus or by slow changes in firing rate due to fluid pumping (“acoustic streaming”), which causes cupula deflection. Both mechanisms will act to increase the primary afferent firing rate and so trigger nystagmus. The primary afferent data in guinea pigs indicate that in some situations, these two mechanisms may oppose each other. This review has shown how these three clinical phenomena—skull vibration-induced nystagmus, enhanced vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and the Tullio phenomenon—have a common tie: they are caused by the new response of semicircular canal afferent neurons to sound and vibration after a semicircular canal dehiscence.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Otorhinolaryngology
Health Sciences > Podiatry
Uncontrolled Keywords:Podiatry, Otorhinolaryngology
Language:English
Date:2 June 2023
Deposited On:13 Feb 2024 08:35
Last Modified:31 May 2024 01:54
Publisher:PAGEpress
ISSN:2039-4330
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3390/audiolres13030037
PubMed ID:37366683
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)