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Modern medical services, a double-edged sword manages symptoms, but accumulates genetic background of cardiovascular diseases: A cross populational analysis of 217 countries


You, Wenpeng; Henneberg, Maciej (2024). Modern medical services, a double-edged sword manages symptoms, but accumulates genetic background of cardiovascular diseases: A cross populational analysis of 217 countries. Health Science Reports, 7(1):e1828.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Through reduced natural selection, measured with Biological State Index (I $_{bs}$), modern medicine enables most people to survive well beyond the reproductive lifespan leading to deleterious gene accumulation in population. This study explored the role of reduced natural selection in increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence worldwide.

METHODS

Country-specific estimates of CVD incidence and the index of reduced natural selection were captured for analysis of their correlation. Aging, affluence, obesity prevalence, and urbanization were considered as the potential confounders in the analyses.

RESULTS

Worldwide, I $_{bs}$ was significantly correlated with CVD incidence in the bivariate correlation analyses. This relationship remains when the contributing effects from aging, affluence, obesity prevalence, and urbanization are removed in partial correlation model. Multiple linear regression (enter) shows that I $_{bs}$ is a significant predictor of CVD incidence. Stepwise multiple linear regression selects I $_{bs}$ as the variable having the second greatest influence on CVD incidence after ageing. I $_{bs}$ showed a significantly greater correlation with CVD incidence in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) than in high-income countries.

CONCLUSION

Worldwide, through reducing natural selection, the side effects of healthcare services may have been partially contributing to the increase of CVD incidence worldwide with special regard to LMICs.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS

Through reduced natural selection, measured with Biological State Index (I $_{bs}$), modern medicine enables most people to survive well beyond the reproductive lifespan leading to deleterious gene accumulation in population. This study explored the role of reduced natural selection in increasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence worldwide.

METHODS

Country-specific estimates of CVD incidence and the index of reduced natural selection were captured for analysis of their correlation. Aging, affluence, obesity prevalence, and urbanization were considered as the potential confounders in the analyses.

RESULTS

Worldwide, I $_{bs}$ was significantly correlated with CVD incidence in the bivariate correlation analyses. This relationship remains when the contributing effects from aging, affluence, obesity prevalence, and urbanization are removed in partial correlation model. Multiple linear regression (enter) shows that I $_{bs}$ is a significant predictor of CVD incidence. Stepwise multiple linear regression selects I $_{bs}$ as the variable having the second greatest influence on CVD incidence after ageing. I $_{bs}$ showed a significantly greater correlation with CVD incidence in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) than in high-income countries.

CONCLUSION

Worldwide, through reducing natural selection, the side effects of healthcare services may have been partially contributing to the increase of CVD incidence worldwide with special regard to LMICs.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Evolutionary Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > General Medicine
Language:English
Date:22 January 2024
Deposited On:21 Feb 2024 10:50
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 03:32
Publisher:Wiley Open Access
ISSN:2398-8835
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/hsr2.1828
PubMed ID:38260183
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)