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Predictors for early and long-term readmission in involuntarily admitted patients


Müller, Mario; Brackmann, Nathalie; Homan, Philipp; Vetter, Stefan; Seifritz, Erich; Ajdacic-Gross, Vladeta; Hotzy, Florian (2024). Predictors for early and long-term readmission in involuntarily admitted patients. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 128:152439.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is a common aim to reduce psychiatric readmissions. Although risk factors for readmissions were described, specific data in the group of patients with potentially aversively experienced involuntary admissions are lacking. To better understand underlying mechanisms, it is important to identify factors that are linked to readmissions in this specific patient group, which is the purpose of the current paper.

METHODS

A four-year cohort of N = 3575 involuntary admissions (IA) was followed-up for subsequent re-hospitalization. Demographic, administrative and clinical factors associated with short- (within 30 days) or long-term (> 30 days) readmissions were examined using logistic regression modelling.

RESULTS

Almost half of all IA cases were readmitted within the observation period, whereof every fifth readmission was within the first month after discharge from the involuntary index hospitalization. Adjusted regression modelling revealed problematic substance use at admission and assisted living or homelessness as risk factors for readmission, while high functioning at discharge, anxiety disorders, no subsequent treatment after discharge or IA due to danger to others were negatively associated with readmission. Factors specifically linked to short-term readmission were substance use and personality disorders, abscondence or discharge by initiation of the clinic, as well as being discharged to any place except the patient's home. There were no specific risk-factors for long-term readmission.

CONCLUSIONS

To prevent readmissions after IA, especially for patients at risk, the aim of treatment strategies should be to focus on intensive discharge planning, enable continuous treatment in the outpatient setting, and provide social support.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

It is a common aim to reduce psychiatric readmissions. Although risk factors for readmissions were described, specific data in the group of patients with potentially aversively experienced involuntary admissions are lacking. To better understand underlying mechanisms, it is important to identify factors that are linked to readmissions in this specific patient group, which is the purpose of the current paper.

METHODS

A four-year cohort of N = 3575 involuntary admissions (IA) was followed-up for subsequent re-hospitalization. Demographic, administrative and clinical factors associated with short- (within 30 days) or long-term (> 30 days) readmissions were examined using logistic regression modelling.

RESULTS

Almost half of all IA cases were readmitted within the observation period, whereof every fifth readmission was within the first month after discharge from the involuntary index hospitalization. Adjusted regression modelling revealed problematic substance use at admission and assisted living or homelessness as risk factors for readmission, while high functioning at discharge, anxiety disorders, no subsequent treatment after discharge or IA due to danger to others were negatively associated with readmission. Factors specifically linked to short-term readmission were substance use and personality disorders, abscondence or discharge by initiation of the clinic, as well as being discharged to any place except the patient's home. There were no specific risk-factors for long-term readmission.

CONCLUSIONS

To prevent readmissions after IA, especially for patients at risk, the aim of treatment strategies should be to focus on intensive discharge planning, enable continuous treatment in the outpatient setting, and provide social support.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Psychiatry, Psychotherapy, and Psychosomatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Social Sciences & Humanities > Clinical Psychology
Health Sciences > Psychiatry and Mental Health
Language:English
Date:January 2024
Deposited On:21 Feb 2024 14:33
Last Modified:31 Mar 2024 01:40
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0010-440X
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2023.152439
PubMed ID:38039919
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)