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Natal legacies cause social and spatial marginalization during dispersal


Catitti, Benedetta; Grüebler, Martin U; Farine, Damien R; Kormann, Urs G (2024). Natal legacies cause social and spatial marginalization during dispersal. Ecology Letters, 27(2):e14366.

Abstract

Early‐life experiences can drive subsequent variation in social behaviours, but how differences among individuals emerge remains unknown. We combined experimental manipulations with GPS‐tracking to investigate the pathways through which developmental conditions affect social network position during the early dispersal of wild red kites (Milvus milvus). Across 211 juveniles from 140 broods, last‐hatched chicks—the least competitive—had the fewest number of peer encounters after fledging. However, when food supplemented, they had more encounters than all others. Using 4425 bird‐days of GPS data, we revealed that this was driven by differential responses to competition, with less competitive individuals naturally spreading out into marginal areas, and clustering in central foraging areas when food supplemented. Our results suggest that early‐life adversities can cause significant natal legacies on individual behaviour beyond independence, with potentially far‐reaching consequences on the social and spatial structure of animal populations.

Abstract

Early‐life experiences can drive subsequent variation in social behaviours, but how differences among individuals emerge remains unknown. We combined experimental manipulations with GPS‐tracking to investigate the pathways through which developmental conditions affect social network position during the early dispersal of wild red kites (Milvus milvus). Across 211 juveniles from 140 broods, last‐hatched chicks—the least competitive—had the fewest number of peer encounters after fledging. However, when food supplemented, they had more encounters than all others. Using 4425 bird‐days of GPS data, we revealed that this was driven by differential responses to competition, with less competitive individuals naturally spreading out into marginal areas, and clustering in central foraging areas when food supplemented. Our results suggest that early‐life adversities can cause significant natal legacies on individual behaviour beyond independence, with potentially far‐reaching consequences on the social and spatial structure of animal populations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Uncontrolled Keywords:Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
Language:English
Date:1 February 2024
Deposited On:01 Mar 2024 12:47
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 03:37
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc.
ISSN:1461-023X
OA Status:Hybrid
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.14366
PubMed ID:38332501
Project Information:
  • : FunderH2020
  • : Grant ID850859
  • : Project TitleECOLBEH - The Ecology of Collective Behaviour
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID187058
  • : Project TitleThe building blocks of complex animal societies
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)