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Porencephalic cysts as a result of placental damage at amniocentesis?


Schinzel, Albert (1981). Porencephalic cysts as a result of placental damage at amniocentesis? Archives of Disease in Childhood, 56(5):405.

Abstract

Sir, We read with interest the paper by Youroukos et al. on porencephalic cysts after amniocentesis. The report adds a central nervous system malformation to the literature regarding injury to the fetus after second trimester amniocentesis for prenatal diagnosis. The authors state that fetal trauma after second trimester amniocentesis is rare, and that the risk of such complications does not outweigh the value of the procedure in the prenatal diagnosis of ,-thalassaemia. In fact, the prenatal procedure used was not amniocentesis (removal of amniotic fluid), but fetal blood sampling. Midtrimester amniocentesis for antenatal detection of chromosomal and some genetic and congenital defects in at-risk populations is an accepted medical procedure. The risk of damage is low (about 0 5 to 1 % at experienced centres).2 Fetal blood sampling however, is currently considered to be at an applied research state, and carries a much higher risk for the fetus (about 9 4% at experienced centres).3 It is important that the two techniques should remain separate when assessing the risks of fetal injury. Families who might benefit by amniocentesis might well deny themselves testing because of incorrect information.

Abstract

Sir, We read with interest the paper by Youroukos et al. on porencephalic cysts after amniocentesis. The report adds a central nervous system malformation to the literature regarding injury to the fetus after second trimester amniocentesis for prenatal diagnosis. The authors state that fetal trauma after second trimester amniocentesis is rare, and that the risk of such complications does not outweigh the value of the procedure in the prenatal diagnosis of ,-thalassaemia. In fact, the prenatal procedure used was not amniocentesis (removal of amniotic fluid), but fetal blood sampling. Midtrimester amniocentesis for antenatal detection of chromosomal and some genetic and congenital defects in at-risk populations is an accepted medical procedure. The risk of damage is low (about 0 5 to 1 % at experienced centres).2 Fetal blood sampling however, is currently considered to be at an applied research state, and carries a much higher risk for the fetus (about 9 4% at experienced centres).3 It is important that the two techniques should remain separate when assessing the risks of fetal injury. Families who might benefit by amniocentesis might well deny themselves testing because of incorrect information.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Health Sciences > Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pediatrics, Perinatology and Child Health, Genetics, Genetics (clinical)
Language:English
Date:May 1981
Deposited On:28 Mar 2024 11:14
Last Modified:30 Apr 2024 01:53
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0003-9888
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/adc.56.5.405-a
Related URLs:https://api.semanticscholar.org/CorpusID: 36800037
PubMed ID:7259267
Other Identification Number:CorpusID: 36800037