Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Unravelling the Thermoregulatory Behaviour of Mosquitoes and Biting Midges: Exploring the Impact of Pathogens, Selection, and Acclimation


Hug, David. Unravelling the Thermoregulatory Behaviour of Mosquitoes and Biting Midges: Exploring the Impact of Pathogens, Selection, and Acclimation. 2024, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science.

Abstract

In this thesis I demonstrate distinct thermal preferences in mosquitoes and biting midges across various environments, challenging previous assumptions. This preference is not just shown in adult mosquitoes but also in larvae, where light has a significant influence on microhabitat selection. Additionally, thermal preferences change based on selection and rearing temperatures. In the context of infections, mosquitoes alter their thermal preferences, preferring warmer or cooler temperatures depending on the pathogen. These adaptations reflect complex interactions between vectors and pathogens, impacting disease transmission dynamics. In summation, this research advances our knowledge of mosquito and biting midge behaviour, offering critical insights into their thermal preferences, adaptive responses, and implications for disease transmission. These findings are instrumental in guiding future strategies for the control of vector-borne diseases and underscore the need for continued research in the face of evolving environmental challenges. Ultimately, this work contributes to our collective efforts to combat insect-borne diseases and protect public health.

Abstract

In this thesis I demonstrate distinct thermal preferences in mosquitoes and biting midges across various environments, challenging previous assumptions. This preference is not just shown in adult mosquitoes but also in larvae, where light has a significant influence on microhabitat selection. Additionally, thermal preferences change based on selection and rearing temperatures. In the context of infections, mosquitoes alter their thermal preferences, preferring warmer or cooler temperatures depending on the pathogen. These adaptations reflect complex interactions between vectors and pathogens, impacting disease transmission dynamics. In summation, this research advances our knowledge of mosquito and biting midge behaviour, offering critical insights into their thermal preferences, adaptive responses, and implications for disease transmission. These findings are instrumental in guiding future strategies for the control of vector-borne diseases and underscore the need for continued research in the face of evolving environmental challenges. Ultimately, this work contributes to our collective efforts to combat insect-borne diseases and protect public health.

Statistics

Downloads

10 downloads since deposited on 26 Mar 2024
10 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Dissertation (cumulative)
Referees:Blanckenhorn Wolf U, Mathis Alexander, Verhulst Niels O, Farine Damien R
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Parasitology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Parasitology

07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
UZH Dissertations
Dewey Decimal Classification:590 Animals (Zoology)
570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Place of Publication:Zürich
Date:25 March 2024
Deposited On:26 Mar 2024 10:37
Last Modified:21 May 2024 20:48
Number of Pages:122
OA Status:Green
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English