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The recruitment of TRiC chaperonin in rotavirus viroplasms correlates with virus replication


Vetter, Janine; Papa, Guido; Tobler, Kurt; Rodriguez, Javier M; Kley, Manuel; Myers, Michael; Wiesendanger, Mahesa; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Luque, Daniel; Burrone, Oscar R; Fraefel, Cornel; Eichwald, Catherine (2024). The recruitment of TRiC chaperonin in rotavirus viroplasms correlates with virus replication. mBio, 15(4):e0049924.

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Rotavirus (RV) replication takes place in the viroplasms, cytosolic inclusions that allow the synthesis of virus genome segments and their encapsidation in the core shell, followed by the addition of the second layer of the virion. The viroplasms are composed of several viral proteins, including NSP5, which serves as the main building block. Microtubules, lipid droplets, and miRNA-7 are among the host components recruited in viroplasms. We investigated the interaction between RV proteins and host components of the viroplasms by performing a pull-down assay of lysates from RV-infected cells expressing NSP5-BiolD2. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry identified all eight subunits of the tailless complex polypeptide I ring complex (TRiC), a cellular chaperonin responsible for folding at least 10% of the cytosolic proteins. Our confirmed findings reveal that TRiC is brought into viroplasms and wraps around newly formed double-layered particles. Chemical inhibition of TRiC and silencing of its subunits drastically reduced virus progeny production. Through direct RNA sequencing, we show that TRiC is critical for RV replication by controlling dsRNA genome segment synthesis, particularly negative-sense single-stranded RNA. Importantly, cryo-electron microscopy analysis shows that TRiC inhibition results in defective virus particles lacking genome segments and polymerase complex (VP1/VP3). Moreover, TRiC associates with VP2 and NSP5 but not with VP1. Also, VP2 is shown to be essential for recruiting TRiC in viroplasms and preserving their globular morphology. This study highlights the essential role of TRiC in viroplasm formation and in facilitating virion assembly during the RV life cycle.

IMPORTANCE
The replication of rotavirus takes place in cytosolic inclusions termed viroplasms. In these inclusions, the distinct 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments are co-packaged to complete a genome in newly generated virus particles. In this study, we show for the first time that the tailless complex polypeptide I ring complex (TRiC), a cellular chaperonin responsible for the folding of at least 10% of the cytosolic proteins, is a component of viroplasms and is required for the synthesis of the viral negative-sense single-stranded RNA. Specifically, TRiC associates with NSP5 and VP2, the cofactor involved in RNA replication. Our study adds a new component to the current model of rotavirus replication, where TRiC is recruited to viroplasms to assist replication.

Abstract

ABSTRACT
Rotavirus (RV) replication takes place in the viroplasms, cytosolic inclusions that allow the synthesis of virus genome segments and their encapsidation in the core shell, followed by the addition of the second layer of the virion. The viroplasms are composed of several viral proteins, including NSP5, which serves as the main building block. Microtubules, lipid droplets, and miRNA-7 are among the host components recruited in viroplasms. We investigated the interaction between RV proteins and host components of the viroplasms by performing a pull-down assay of lysates from RV-infected cells expressing NSP5-BiolD2. Subsequent tandem mass spectrometry identified all eight subunits of the tailless complex polypeptide I ring complex (TRiC), a cellular chaperonin responsible for folding at least 10% of the cytosolic proteins. Our confirmed findings reveal that TRiC is brought into viroplasms and wraps around newly formed double-layered particles. Chemical inhibition of TRiC and silencing of its subunits drastically reduced virus progeny production. Through direct RNA sequencing, we show that TRiC is critical for RV replication by controlling dsRNA genome segment synthesis, particularly negative-sense single-stranded RNA. Importantly, cryo-electron microscopy analysis shows that TRiC inhibition results in defective virus particles lacking genome segments and polymerase complex (VP1/VP3). Moreover, TRiC associates with VP2 and NSP5 but not with VP1. Also, VP2 is shown to be essential for recruiting TRiC in viroplasms and preserving their globular morphology. This study highlights the essential role of TRiC in viroplasm formation and in facilitating virion assembly during the RV life cycle.

IMPORTANCE
The replication of rotavirus takes place in cytosolic inclusions termed viroplasms. In these inclusions, the distinct 11 double-stranded RNA genome segments are co-packaged to complete a genome in newly generated virus particles. In this study, we show for the first time that the tailless complex polypeptide I ring complex (TRiC), a cellular chaperonin responsible for the folding of at least 10% of the cytosolic proteins, is a component of viroplasms and is required for the synthesis of the viral negative-sense single-stranded RNA. Specifically, TRiC associates with NSP5 and VP2, the cofactor involved in RNA replication. Our study adds a new component to the current model of rotavirus replication, where TRiC is recruited to viroplasms to assist replication.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinärwissenschaftliches Institut > Institute of Virology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Microbiology
Life Sciences > Virology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Virology, Microbiology
Language:English
Date:12 March 2024
Deposited On:25 Apr 2024 08:51
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:2150-7511
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/mbio.00499-24
PubMed ID:38470055
Project Information:
  • : FunderUniversity of Zurich
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : Funderpredoctoral ICGEB fellowship
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)