Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Freshwater genome-reduced bacteria exhibit pervasive episodes of adaptive stasis


Serra Moncadas, Lucas; Hofer, Cyrill; Bulzu, Paul-Adrian; Pernthaler, Jakob; Andrei, Adrian-Stefan (2024). Freshwater genome-reduced bacteria exhibit pervasive episodes of adaptive stasis. Nature Communications, 15(1):3421.

Abstract

The emergence of bacterial species is rooted in their inherent potential for continuous evolution and adaptation to an ever-changing ecological landscape. The adaptive capacity of most species frequently resides within the repertoire of genes encoding the secreted proteome (SP), as it serves as a primary interface used to regulate survival/reproduction strategies. Here, by applying evolutionary genomics approaches to metagenomics data, we show that abundant freshwater bacteria exhibit biphasic adaptation states linked to the eco-evolutionary processes governing their genome sizes. While species with average to large genomes adhere to the dominant paradigm of evolution through niche adaptation by reducing the evolutionary pressure on their SPs (via the augmentation of functionally redundant genes that buffer mutational fitness loss) and increasing the phylogenetic distance of recombination events, most of the genome-reduced species exhibit a nonconforming state. In contrast, their SPs reflect a combination of low functional redundancy and high selection pressure, resulting in significantly higher levels of conservation and invariance. Our findings indicate that although niche adaptation is the principal mechanism driving speciation, freshwater genome-reduced bacteria often experience extended periods of adaptive stasis. Understanding the adaptive state of microbial species will lead to a better comprehension of their spatiotemporal dynamics, biogeography, and resilience to global change.

Abstract

The emergence of bacterial species is rooted in their inherent potential for continuous evolution and adaptation to an ever-changing ecological landscape. The adaptive capacity of most species frequently resides within the repertoire of genes encoding the secreted proteome (SP), as it serves as a primary interface used to regulate survival/reproduction strategies. Here, by applying evolutionary genomics approaches to metagenomics data, we show that abundant freshwater bacteria exhibit biphasic adaptation states linked to the eco-evolutionary processes governing their genome sizes. While species with average to large genomes adhere to the dominant paradigm of evolution through niche adaptation by reducing the evolutionary pressure on their SPs (via the augmentation of functionally redundant genes that buffer mutational fitness loss) and increasing the phylogenetic distance of recombination events, most of the genome-reduced species exhibit a nonconforming state. In contrast, their SPs reflect a combination of low functional redundancy and high selection pressure, resulting in significantly higher levels of conservation and invariance. Our findings indicate that although niche adaptation is the principal mechanism driving speciation, freshwater genome-reduced bacteria often experience extended periods of adaptive stasis. Understanding the adaptive state of microbial species will lead to a better comprehension of their spatiotemporal dynamics, biogeography, and resilience to global change.

Statistics

Citations

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 02 May 2024
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > General Chemistry
Life Sciences > General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
Physical Sciences > General Physics and Astronomy
Language:English
Date:23 April 2024
Deposited On:02 May 2024 11:55
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:2041-1723
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-024-47767-7
PubMed ID:38653968
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)