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Animal models to study cognitive impairment of chronic kidney disease


Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is common in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its prevalence increases with progressive loss of kidney function. MCI is characterized by a decline in cognitive performance greater than expected for an individual age and education level but with minimal impairment of instrumental activities of daily living. Deterioration can affect one or several cognitive domains (attention, memory, executive functions, language, and perceptual motor or social cognition). Given the increasing prevalence of kidney disease, more and more people with CKD will also develop MCI causing an enormous disease burden for these individuals, their relatives and society. However, the underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood and current therapies mostly aim at supporting patients in their daily life. This illustrates the urgent need to elucidate the pathogenesis, and potential therapeutic targets and test novel therapies in appropriate preclinical models. Here, we will outline the necessary criteria for experimental modelling of cognitive disorders in CKD. We discuss the use of mice, rats and zebrafish as model systems and present valuable techniques through which kidney function and cognitive impairment can be assessed in this setting. Our objective is to enable researchers to overcome hurdles and accelerate preclinical research aimed at improving therapy of people with CKD and MCI.

Abstract

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is common in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its prevalence increases with progressive loss of kidney function. MCI is characterized by a decline in cognitive performance greater than expected for an individual age and education level but with minimal impairment of instrumental activities of daily living. Deterioration can affect one or several cognitive domains (attention, memory, executive functions, language, and perceptual motor or social cognition). Given the increasing prevalence of kidney disease, more and more people with CKD will also develop MCI causing an enormous disease burden for these individuals, their relatives and society. However, the underlying pathomechanisms are poorly understood and current therapies mostly aim at supporting patients in their daily life. This illustrates the urgent need to elucidate the pathogenesis, and potential therapeutic targets and test novel therapies in appropriate preclinical models. Here, we will outline the necessary criteria for experimental modelling of cognitive disorders in CKD. We discuss the use of mice, rats and zebrafish as model systems and present valuable techniques through which kidney function and cognitive impairment can be assessed in this setting. Our objective is to enable researchers to overcome hurdles and accelerate preclinical research aimed at improving therapy of people with CKD and MCI.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:1 June 2024
Deposited On:09 May 2024 10:41
Last Modified:24 May 2024 01:07
Publisher:American Physiological Society
ISSN:1522-1466
OA Status:Closed
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00338.2023
PubMed ID:38634137
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