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Humanized mice for studying HIV latency and potentially its eradication


Hasler, Moa F; Speck, Roberto F; Kadzioch, Nicole P (2024). Humanized mice for studying HIV latency and potentially its eradication. Current opinion in HIV and AIDS, 19(3):157-167.

Abstract

Purpose of the review
The quest for an HIV cure faces a formidable challenge: the persistent presence of latent viral infections within the cells and tissues of infected individuals. This review provides a thorough examination of discussions surrounding HIV latency, the use of humanized mouse models, and strategies aimed at eliminating the latent HIV reservoir. It explores the hurdles and advancements in understanding HIV pathogenesis, mainly focusing on establishing latent reservoirs in CD4$^{+}$ T cells and macrophages. Introducing the concepts of functional and sterile cures, the review underscores the indispensable role of humanized mouse models in HIV research, offering crucial insights into the efficacy of cART and the ongoing pursuit of an HIV cure.

Recent findings
Here, we highlight studies investigating molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis related to HIV latency in humanized mice and discuss novel strategies for eradicating latent HIV. Emphasizing the importance of analytical cART interruption in humanized mouse studies to gauge its impact on the latent reservoir accurately, the review underlines the ongoing progress and challenges in harnessing humanized mouse models for HIV research.

Summary
This review suggests that humanized mice models provide valuable insights into HIV latency and potential eradication strategies, contributing significantly to the quest for an HIV cure.

Abstract

Purpose of the review
The quest for an HIV cure faces a formidable challenge: the persistent presence of latent viral infections within the cells and tissues of infected individuals. This review provides a thorough examination of discussions surrounding HIV latency, the use of humanized mouse models, and strategies aimed at eliminating the latent HIV reservoir. It explores the hurdles and advancements in understanding HIV pathogenesis, mainly focusing on establishing latent reservoirs in CD4$^{+}$ T cells and macrophages. Introducing the concepts of functional and sterile cures, the review underscores the indispensable role of humanized mouse models in HIV research, offering crucial insights into the efficacy of cART and the ongoing pursuit of an HIV cure.

Recent findings
Here, we highlight studies investigating molecular mechanisms and pathogenesis related to HIV latency in humanized mice and discuss novel strategies for eradicating latent HIV. Emphasizing the importance of analytical cART interruption in humanized mouse studies to gauge its impact on the latent reservoir accurately, the review underlines the ongoing progress and challenges in harnessing humanized mouse models for HIV research.

Summary
This review suggests that humanized mice models provide valuable insights into HIV latency and potential eradication strategies, contributing significantly to the quest for an HIV cure.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Scopus Subject Areas:Life Sciences > Immunology
Health Sciences > Hematology
Health Sciences > Oncology
Health Sciences > Oncology (nursing)
Health Sciences > Infectious Diseases
Life Sciences > Virology
Language:English
Date:May 2024
Deposited On:22 May 2024 11:48
Last Modified:23 May 2024 20:00
Publisher:Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
ISSN:1746-630X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/coh.0000000000000855
PubMed ID:38547338
Project Information:
  • : FunderSNSF
  • : Grant ID212566
  • : Project TitlePathogenic significance of the ubiquitin specific peptidase (USP) 18 in HIV infection
  • : FunderNIH
  • : Grant ID5R01AI145045-03
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderVontobel-Stiftung
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title
  • : FunderVSM Foundation
  • : Grant ID
  • : Project Title