Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Empowering citizen scientists to improve water quality: from monitoring to action


Abstract

Citizen science (CS) has so far failed to achieve its potential to contribute to water resource management globally despite a significant body of work proclaiming the benefits of such an approach. Also, this work has addressed concerns over precision, accuracy and reliability of methods used. This article presents the findings of a hackathon-type workshop challenge that brought together water quality experts and CS practitioners to explore barriers and possible solutions to mainstream citizen scientist-generated data into national, regional, and global reporting processes, and thereby provide a tangible connection between policy makers and community-based citizen scientists. We present the findings here as a perspective-type summary. This workshop challenge highlighted the breadth and scope of CS activities globally yet recognized that their potential for positive impact is going unrealized. The challenge team proposed that impact could be improved by: developing awareness; applying a simultaneous bottom-up/top-down approach to increase success rates; that local leaders or ‘catalysts' are key to initiate and sustain activities; that generated data need to fulfill a purpose and create required information, and ultimately, lead to actions (data > information > action); recognizing that we are all potential citizen scientists is important; recognizing that “good water quality” is subjective; and lastly that developing a communication gateway that allows bi-directional data and information transfer is essential.

Abstract

Citizen science (CS) has so far failed to achieve its potential to contribute to water resource management globally despite a significant body of work proclaiming the benefits of such an approach. Also, this work has addressed concerns over precision, accuracy and reliability of methods used. This article presents the findings of a hackathon-type workshop challenge that brought together water quality experts and CS practitioners to explore barriers and possible solutions to mainstream citizen scientist-generated data into national, regional, and global reporting processes, and thereby provide a tangible connection between policy makers and community-based citizen scientists. We present the findings here as a perspective-type summary. This workshop challenge highlighted the breadth and scope of CS activities globally yet recognized that their potential for positive impact is going unrealized. The challenge team proposed that impact could be improved by: developing awareness; applying a simultaneous bottom-up/top-down approach to increase success rates; that local leaders or ‘catalysts' are key to initiate and sustain activities; that generated data need to fulfill a purpose and create required information, and ultimately, lead to actions (data > information > action); recognizing that we are all potential citizen scientists is important; recognizing that “good water quality” is subjective; and lastly that developing a communication gateway that allows bi-directional data and information transfer is essential.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

2 downloads since deposited on 28 May 2024
2 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not_refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Scopus Subject Areas:Physical Sciences > Water Science and Technology
Language:English
Date:15 April 2024
Deposited On:28 May 2024 15:11
Last Modified:30 Jun 2024 01:41
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:2624-9375
OA Status:Gold
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/frwa.2024.1367198
  • Content: Published Version
  • Language: English
  • Licence: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)